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Recipes - Lunch & Dinner

Maple-Vanilla Greek Yogurt
By Betsy Nelson
Making your own flavored yogurt is a breeze — and you can control the ingredients and sugar level to boot. This is a perfect base for granola-fruit parfaits.
Adriane-Angarano's-Meatballs
By Adriane Angarano
Spice up your lunch menu with these turkey and veggie meatballs.
Kathie-Swift-Tempeh-Skewers
By Kathie Swift
Makeover your lunchbox with these veggie skewers!
Asian-Inspired-Salmon-Nicoise
By Betsy Nelson
A great showcase for fresh seasonal vegetables (you can sub in any you like or happen to have on hand), this recipe is a new take on the classic French salade niçoise. Cook and chill salmon in advance, or use leftover salmon if you prefer.
Salmon-and-Salad
By Betsy Nelson
Miso is a fermented paste traditionally made with soybeans. There are many different types available; red miso is particularly good for this dish. Serve on a bed of brown rice with a side of braised greens.
Salmon-Baked-in-Parchment
By Betsy Nelson
Use any fresh veggies you have on hand for this recipe. The moisture and flavor from the vegetables help steam and season the salmon. The bags can be prepared a few hours before cooking and stored in the refrigerator.
Cajun-Salmon-Burger
By Betsy Nelson
Salmon burgers can be prepped a day in advance. To save time, ask your butcher to skin and bone the fish. In a pinch, you can also use canned or leftover salmon. For an Italian-inspired burger, substitute fresh basil for the green onions and sun-dried tomatoes or olives for the jalapeños. For a burger with an Asian flair, add a teaspoon of fresh grated gingerroot, and use tamari and cayenne instead of salt and pepper.
Polenta
By Betsy Nelson
This simple-but-hearty polenta crust, adapted from Lynne Rossetto Kasper’s The Italian Country Table, is a cinch using Kasper’s double-boiler technique.
Socca Crust
By Betsy Nelson
Socca is a kind of crepe made with chickpea flour. It makes a delightfully delicate pizza crust. Try adding chopped herbs or spices to the batter before baking. It’s an Italian tradition to crack an egg onto a pizza and bake until it is just slightly set. When you cut into the pizza, the liquid yolk runs onto the crust and adds to the flavor.
Potato Crust
By Betsy Nelson
Savory and satisfying, pissaladière is a classic southern French pizzalike tart made with caramelized onions, garlic, anchovies, olives — and no cheese! We throw mushrooms into the mix here. This hearty, simple crust is terrific with full-flavored toppings.
Mochi Crust
By Betsy Nelson
Traditional mochi, which is glutinous rice, creates a thick crust that is crunchy on the outside and gooey on the inside. (This preparation makes it thin and crispy.) Adding pears to a pizza may seem unusual, but the fruit’s sweetness pairs wonderfully with the salty ham. Avoid overloading the delicate mochi crust.
Cauliflower Crust
By Betsy Nelson
Compatible with most savory pizza toppings, this delicate crust is best made into personal-size pizzas. The BLT-inspired topping here uses fresh arugula to zing things up.
braised lamb shanks
By Betsy Nelson
Parsnips impart an aromatic quality to this slow-cooked dish, which is perfect for a Sunday supper. Mint adds a fresh flavor element to gremolata, a dry condiment traditionally made with parsley, lemon zest, and garlic.
Parsnip fries and beet ketchup
By Betsy Nelson
Want to get really roots-y? Dip these root-veggie fries — parsnips are super, but celery root, parsley root, and rutabagas work, too — into a homemade beet ketchup.
Risotto
By Betsy Nelson
This light, grain-free take on risotto uses grated root veggies in place of the traditional arborio rice. For a creamy risotto, sub in ½ cup coconut milk for part of the vegetable stock.
Terikaki-braised-tunrups-and-greens-with-bacon
By Betsy Nelson
East Asia meets the American South in this lively recipe. If your turnips have attached greens, use them instead of the collard greens.
Moroccan-Soup
By Betsy Nelson
Almond butter lends this hearty autumnal soup a velvety, creamy texture. Add chicken, lamb, beef, or pork, if you like. Or, for a vegan soup, use vegetable stock as a base.
Gratin
By Betsy Nelson
This creamy, comforting gratin is a cinch to make. If crème fraîche is not available, sub heavy whipping cream or sour cream.
Thai-and-Pork-Lettuce-Cups
By David Perlmutter, MD
This zesty mix makes a light and refreshing lunch that is a cinch to pull together. It can be served atop lettuce leaves, or wrapped inside them for a gluten-free spring-rolls presentation. Ground chicken, turkey, or lamb may be substituted for the pork.
green soup
By Experience Life Staff
Blending seeds into soups and stews adds a naturally creamy quality to the dish. This soup is delicious served warm or chilled.
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