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PUMPING IRONY: On the Alzheimer’s Frontier, Big Pharma Plays Regulatory Roulette

By Craig Cox

New research suggests that we may be closer than ever to understanding a cause of Alzheimer’s. Will a suddenly more scrupulous Food and Drug Administration give serious consideration to novel treatment options?

a woman meets with her family to share her recent medical diagnosis

How to Share a Difficult Diagnosis

By Jessie Sholl

The decision to disclose an illness to others is often a complicated one. This guidance can help you share the news your way.

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PUMPING IRONY: Dementia, Redefined

By Craig Cox

The Alzheimer’s Association and its Big Pharma allies are working behind the scenes to promote a plan that could vastly increase dementia diagnoses — and, not coincidentally, the demand for drugs that provide little relief.

test tubes labeled HDL test

PUMPING IRONY: Too Much of a Good Thing?

By Craig Cox

Recent research suggests that the “good” cholesterol that helps seniors prevent heart attacks and strokes may also raise their risk of developing dementia.

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PUMPING IRONY: An Antidote for Alzheimer’s?

By Craig Cox

Can lifestyle changes free us from the ravages of dementia? Recent research offers a modicum of hope, but few assurances.

A COMFY CHAIR

PUMPING IRONY: Beware of the Chair?

By Craig Cox

A new study suggests that seniors who spend too much time sitting around may be more prone to develop dementia — even if they exercise regularly.

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How to Keep Your Brain Healthy as You Age

With Edward Park, PhD
Season 7, Episode 3

Our brains age just like the rest of our bodies, and just like it’s important to care for our bodies so we can move functionally well for as long as possible, it’s also essential to do everything we can to maintain and support healthy brain function as the years pass by. With the current absence of effective treatment options for most neurological diseases, prevention really is the best treatment for them, and it’s never too early — or too late — to start. Edward Park, PhD, explains what to know about normal and abnormal brain aging, as well as the lifestyle strategies we have control over to support our brain health and help reduce the risk of decline and disease.

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medicare

PUMPING IRONY: Puzzling Priorities

By Craig Cox

Medicare is prepared to pay as much as $5 billion a year to cover a new Alzheimer’s drug while ignoring the in-home care needs of seniors with dementia who live alone.

Healthy Aging and the Brain: 5 Ways to Improve Neuroplasticity

Healthy Aging and the Brain: 5 Ways to Improve Neuroplasticity

By Emily Ewen

The importance of exercising our brains as we age and advice for easy ways to strengthen cognitive functioning.

an elderly man sits in a chair looking out the window

5 Surprising Factors to Reduce the Risk of Dementia

By Michael Dregni

Eating well, prioritizing sleep, and exercising help to protect against dementia, but there are other several other factors that play an important role as well. Learn more.

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Which Health Conditions Are Considered Inflammatory?

By Mo Perry

Chronic conditions such as autoimmune disorders, Alzheimer’s, and certain types of arthritis indicate some level of inflammation.

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PUMPING IRONY: This Is Your Brain on Junk Food

By Craig Cox

As Big Pharma’s latest Alzheimer’s drug faces renewed skepticism, a new study suggests that avoiding ultraprocessed food may be a more promising approach to maintaining healthy cognitive function as we age.

brain cells connecting

PUMPING IRONY: Zapped!

By Craig Cox

Can we cure dementia by zapping our brains with electrical currents? Some enterprising researchers would certainly like us to think so.

Frank Lipman

10 Rules for Aging Well

With Frank Lipman, MD
Season 5, Episode 17

Every second of every day, all of us are aging, and yet we often wait to address — or altogether avoid — age-related concerns about our health until we reach a certain point in our years or our capabilities begin to diminish. Frank Lipman, MD, shares 10 essential factors he’s outlined for aging well, emphasizing that it’s never too late — or too early — to start embracing them, and that it’s not as difficult as you might think.

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a senior woman reads while in a coffee shop

PUMPING IRONY: Is It Time for a New Take on Dementia?

By Craig Cox

As Big Pharma continues to flail away on the Alzheimer’s front, new research increasingly turns toward identifying lifestyle changes that can lower the risk of falling prey to the disease.

A Life Time team member working with a member who's using the InBody scale in the club.

5 Markers For Every Health-Conscious Person to Know

By Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT

Regularly testing for and tracking these markers can provide invaluable insights to the course of your health journey.

a man vacuums his living room

Is Doing Housework Good for Your Brain?

By Craig Cox

Vacuuming and cleaning windows may help our cognition and attention spans, according to a recent study.

a woman rests with a barbell on her shoulders

Can Exercise Build Brain “Muscle”?

By Michael Dregni

Yes, according to recent research — and it might also help reduce the neuroinflammation connected with Alzheimer’s.

a seeded dandelion and setting sun

Coping With Ambiguous Loss

By Alexandra Smith, MA, LPCC

How do we find closure when we’re not even sure the door has closed?

wooden game pieces with a blue piece trapped inside a circle of tan pieces and a red one inside a circle of pieces with gaps for escape

PUMPING IRONY: Typecast

By Craig Cox

Can certain personality traits protect us from cognitive dysfunction as we grow old? New research holds out some hope, but I have my doubts.

a cat sleeps while snuggling with its owner

PUMPING IRONY: Unsettled by Snoozing?

By Craig Cox

Could regular daytime napping be a precursor to dementia — or even a sign that the disease has already taken hold? A new take on what has generally been considered a salutary practice creates some concerns, despite its caveats. I’m going to try not to lose any sleep over it.

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