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LATEST STORIES

a calendar with stick pins and weights

PUMPING IRONY: Movement and Memory

By Craig Cox
Physical activity has long been shown to improve cognitive function, but a new study suggests we may be able to modify our workouts to boost specific types of memory.
a pair of glasses sits on a compute

PUMPING IRONY: A Harsh Light

By Craig Cox
All the time we spend staring at screens could be shortening our lifespan, according to a new study. We do have options, though returning to the typewriter is not one of them.
brain cells connecting

PUMPING IRONY: Zapped!

By Craig Cox
Can we cure dementia by zapping our brains with electrical currents? Some enterprising researchers would certainly like us to think so.
a man writes on a notpas

PUMPING IRONY: Working on Purpose

By Craig Cox
I’ve discovered plenty of good reasons for postponing retirement and continuing to pursue purposeful work, but a new study suggests I may have overlooked an important one: It could help prevent a stroke.
a colorful array of pills in silver packaging

PUMPING IRONY: A Tough Pill to Swallow

By Craig Cox
The Inflation Reduction Act will make some prescription drugs much more affordable for strapped Medicare beneficiaries. But will it deepen our dependence on Big Pharma?
blocks with people figures with one in red being looked at through a magnifying glass

PUMPING IRONY: Class and Cognition

By Craig Cox
A new study suggests that people mired in low-wage jobs for long periods of time may suffer cognitive decline earlier in life than those favored with a more affluent life. My checkered career leaves me wondering where I stand.
balancing rocks on a desk

PUMPING IRONY: Too Busy to Calm Down?

By Craig Cox
Struggling with a stressful workload in recent weeks, I’m struck by new research describing how chronic stress can accelerate the aging of our immune systems. So, why am I avoiding a proven stress-relief practice?
a sick looking peace lily

PUMPING IRONY: Epic Fail?

By Craig Cox
Elderly patients are often tagged with a “failure to thrive” label when doctors simply don’t want to spend the time and energy to determine a specific diagnosis. While leading geriatricians continue to argue against the designation, others point to its more salutary effects.
a senior woman reads while in a coffee shop

PUMPING IRONY: Is It Time for a New Take on Dementia?

By Craig Cox
As Big Pharma continues to flail away on the Alzheimer’s front, new research increasingly turns toward identifying lifestyle changes that can lower the risk of falling prey to the disease.
a man sits at a coffee shop paying his bill with a credit card

PUMPING IRONY: Easy Pickings

By Craig Cox
Some 5 million elderly Americans fall prey to scam artists each year, and those who struggle to maintain social connections may be more vulnerable than most. A new evaluation program designed to measure an individual’s ability to make good choices could offer some help.
a woman standing in tree pose

PUMPING IRONY: Can Poor Balance Later in Life Increase Your Risk of Death?

By Craig Cox
A new study suggests that poor balance may dramatically raise the risk of death — especially among the elderly. The conclusions, however, are about as rickety as my tree pose.
an elderly woman eats ice cream

PUMPING IRONY: Dying to Get Better

By Craig Cox
A trip to hospice typically means you’ve given up on life. But what if you could receive in-home palliative care while still pursuing treatments for your afflictions? A Medicare pilot program suggests it could prolong lives — and save the agency money.
a grandpa and grandson run together

PUMPING IRONY: When Pondering Old Age, Think Positive

By Craig Cox
Cultural messages about the perils of old age often make it tempting to assume the worst about what lies ahead, but a new book argues that an upbeat view of aging can actually lead to a longer, more fulfilling life.
a variety of small, wooden homes

PUMPING IRONY: The Downsizing Dilemma

By Craig Cox
COVID, interest rates, and a tight housing market have dampened the appeal of downsizing for many empty nesters. But that only partially explains why we’re adding a second bathroom 10 years after the kids moved away.
a robot's hand holding an apple

PUMPING IRONY: Robots to the Rescue?

By Craig Cox
The first comprehensive review of U.S. nursing homes in more than 35 years reveals an industry that has done little to improve resident care. And while policymakers talk about reform, everyone else seems to be talking about robots.
covid vaccine + covid vaccine = heart

PUMPING IRONY: In Need of a Boost

By Craig Cox
U.S. seniors have rolled up their sleeves for the initial rounds of COVID vaccines at a rate far above average, but as COVID-related deaths among vaccinated Americans continue to rise, public-health officials worry that too many have stopped short of the booster.
a truck driver sits in the driver seat

PUMPING IRONY: Total Recall

By Craig Cox
The thousands of retirees lured back into the workforce by companies desperate for workers are experiencing the kind of job security they could only dream of in pre-pandemic times. They may also be accruing some surprising neurological benefits.
a man in a wheelchair looks at a flight of stairs

PUMPING IRONY: A Formula for Frailty

By Craig Cox
An outing with an elderly friend seems to corroborate recent research weighing the impact of social isolation on the physical fitness of seniors.
wooden game pieces with a blue piece trapped inside a circle of tan pieces and a red one inside a circle of pieces with gaps for escape

PUMPING IRONY: Typecast

By Craig Cox
Can certain personality traits protect us from cognitive dysfunction as we grow old? New research holds out some hope, but I have my doubts.
a pharmacists holds a prescription

PUMPING IRONY: Is There a Pharmacist in the House?

By Craig Cox
The pandemic has pushed pharmacists into primary-care territory traditionally dominated by physicians, and some policymakers believe convenience and expense argue for giving them even more latitude to test and treat. The American Medical Association begs to differ.
A medical professional holds a piggy bank that has a band-aid on its head.

PUMPING IRONY: Home Healthcare Shakeup: Palliative or Predatory?

By Craig Cox
Health-insurance conglomerates are gobbling up home-healthcare companies, despite the industry’s inability to attract and retain workers. Early signs suggest that few of the benefits of these mergers will accrue to caregivers and their elderly clients.
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