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A curve in the road and a traffic sign are pictured.
By Craig Cox
Mysterious aches and pain are always going to erupt as we grow older; it doesn’t mean we’re doomed to a future of frailty.
A piggy bank with glasses
By Craig Cox
My path to retirement has long been littered with financial obstacles. Recent research suggests that may not be such a bad thing.
A rectangular red box is surrounded by Christmas ribbons.
By Craig Cox
We were determined not to exchange Christmas gifts this year. Then reality intervened.
An open bottle of aspirin
By Craig Cox
Just as new research warns heart-healthy older folks that taking aspirin to prevent a heart attack could be fatal, another study suggests regular doses could fend off cancer. I just wish it would work when I get a headache.
A person reaching for keys
By Craig Cox
Because we’re all living longer lives, longevity visionaries suggest we need to rethink societal norms around aging. I have my doubts that social engineering is the answer.
A hand drawing stick figures on a chalkboard
By Craig Cox
Robust social connections are key to our well-being as we age, so should I worry that my circle of friends has been narrowing for years? Not so much.
An empty hospital bed is pictured.
By Craig Cox
Government attempts to curb falls in the hospital have limited mobility so much that elderly patients often head home in worse shape than when they arrived.
An open road with the words PAST, PRESENT, and FUTURE superimposed on it
By Craig Cox
While some of my geezer contemporaries are taking offense at Generation Z’s campaign to blame us for the state of the world, I say bring it on.
An atmospheric shot of hearing aids
By Craig Cox
There’s plenty of evidence showing that hearing loss can damage our quality of life as we grow older, but the senior set — including my brother — seems immune to the warnings. 
hand with illustration of brain
By Craig Cox
Conventional wisdom suggests that my lazy brain offers few benefits, but Harvard researchers believe it may be the key to a long life.
One shiny penny among a group of dull ones
By Craig Cox
Recent research suggests that frequent bouts of poverty prior to middle age may contribute to premature aging. If that’s the case, I should be sitting on death’s doorstep by now.
A picture of a surgical mask, thermometer, and pills
By Craig Cox
The alarming rise of drug-resistant superbugs in nursing homes is just another reason to do everything I can to maintain my good health and live out my days in my own home.
A scientist holds a petrie dish.
By Craig Cox
Recent research suggests that all frail seniors need to do to boost their strength — and maybe even reduce their waistlines — is to have the right combination of bacteria in their guts. I’d rather lift weights.
A person testing their blood sugar
By Craig Cox
New guidelines seeking to address the healthcare industry’s overtreatment of elderly diabetics may encounter a skeptical audience: elderly diabetics.
An overweight person measures their waistline.
By Craig Cox
A new study explains why we tend to gain weight as we age, even if our caloric intake and exercise regimens remain unchanged.
An elderly woman sits alone at a table, before an empty plate.
By Craig Cox
A quiet epidemic of malnutrition has spread among the nation’s elderly, and Congress has only a few weeks to figure out how to respond.
Two glasses half-filled with water. One says
By Craig Cox
Do optimists live longer than pessimists? Maybe, but I’m not the only one arguing that a middle way may yield healthier benefits.
Two people holds hands.
By Craig Cox
An old friend faces a future with Parkinson’s and an eventual move to an assisted-living facility that, barring an industry shift, will probably offer no medical care.
pills
By Craig Cox
For this drug-averse geezer, recent research suggesting that long-term use of certain pharmaceuticals may contribute to dementia makes me even less likely to follow my doctor’s advice.
hospital surgery room stretcher
By Craig Cox
The elderly often climb on the operating table unprepared for the risks of surgery. New guidelines aim to help them — and their doctors — make more informed decisions.
A pencil lies atop a crossword puzzle.
By Craig Cox
At my age, I’m often at a loss when trying to retrieve some bit of information from my memory banks. A new study suggests brain games and other mentally stimulating activities may help — sort of.
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