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a woman wearing headphones
By Karen Bannan
From quiet to deafening, here are average decibel levels for everyday sounds in the world around us.
a woman holds a hearing aid
By Craig Cox
FDA's inaction hinders development of affordable hearing aids.
a man talks to his doctor through a computer at home
By Michael Dregni
A new home test called the fecal immunochemical test might help millions of Americans who are behind on colonoscopy screenings.
a woman running with the bright sun shining in the background
By Michael Dregni
Could endocannabinoids —not endorphins — be the answer?
two sets of feet with hiking boots overlooking a mountain lake
By Molly Tynjala
Learn how going outdoors can help ease depression and hypertension and improve resiliency and immunity.
A woman distracted on her phone during an attempt to work out at home.
By Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT
Plus, five ways to stop delaying your health and fitness efforts.
measuring spoons with the tablespoon filled with sugar
By Molly Tynjala
Even moderate amounts of added sugar in our diets can negatively affect our liver, according to a recent study.
Coach Anika's headshot on a background image of various healthy foods and exercise equipment.

When it comes to building optimal health — including goals like losing weight — fitness and nutrition are often the two main factors that are associated with results. But there are many other lifestyle behaviors that influence your ability to reach and sustain your goals. Anika Christ, RD, CPT, joins us to take a comprehensive look, offering strategies for better health as a whole — and weight loss as a byproduct.

illustration of person sitting in a wreath that starts as a dead withered root and opens into a colorful flower
By Emily Nagoski, PhD
Human Giver Syndrome makes women uniquely vulnerable to stress-related illnesses and burnout. Renowned health educator Emily Nagoski, PhD, offers strategies we can all use to relieve the tension.
a woman pulls a face mask away and smells flowers
By Craig Cox
Many people who've recovered from COVID-19 lose their sense of smell or suffer from a condition called parosmia, which is a distorted sense of smell. Smell training would help.
illustration of woman using tapping technique
By Courtney Lewis Opdahl
This holistic-healing technique uses the body’s acupressure points to lower stress and reset your mind.
headshot of Dr. Shefali
By Courtney Lewis Opdahl
With a blend of Western psychology and Eastern philosophy, therapist and author Dr. Shefali offers a path to authenticity and liberation.
pins create a "network" with string
By Courtney Helgoe
Why social determinants, such as access to quality housing, education, and fresh food, can have an impact on your well-being.
a doctor holds test tubes with color tops
By Laine Bergeson Becco
Targeted lab testing can help provide root-cause data.
hands hold dirt with a small plant
By Courtney Helgoe
The health of the planet and of humans is one and the same.
a person picks up a psychedelic substance with a tweezers
By Kaelyn Riley
Some health providers are using psychedelics to help treat depression, anxiety, and PTSD.
a man meets with his doctor through a computer
By Laine Bergeson Becco
For those with chronic conditions, telemedicine is a boon.
a cup of hot green tea
By Craig Cox
Drinking green tea at least three times a week is associated with a lower risk of heart disease and stroke, according to recent research.
a woman prepares to go for a walk or run with her smart watch and earphones
By Laine Bergeson Becco
The pros and cons of biotracking.
overhead image of 4 people holding hands
By Kaelyn Riley
Taking a more humane approach to addiction can help all of us.
an arrangement of calla lillies
By Maggie Fazeli Fard
Death-positivity can help us reframe the end of life.
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