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Recipes - Side Dishes

collard greens
By Betsy Nelson
The turmeric in this dish adds a beautiful color to the sauce. You can sub Swiss chard or kale for the collards, but reduce the cooking time slightly because they are more tender.
chutney
By Betsy Nelson
This creamy chutney adds brightness to any Indian recipe, and is especially tasty on a lamb curry.
By Raghavan Iyer
This recipe is from 660 Curries by Raghavan Iyer.
Brussels Sprouts
By Betsy Nelson
This dish is great alongside grilled meats or fish. Freshly grated coconut adds rich flavor, but if you don’t have fresh coconut, look for frozen grated coconut at Indian or health-food markets to use instead. If you have only dried coconut, soak it overnight in 1/4 cup coconut water.
Mustard
By Erin Coopey
Described in winelike terms, this mustard is rich and complex — spicy, tangy, sweet, and nutty, with exotic undertones.
Ketchup
By Erin Coopey
As a sweet sauce, a little ketchup can go a long way. You can moderate your sugar intake by experimenting with variations of this recipe. Reduce the amount of sugar by half, or try using ¾ cup honey or 2/3 cup molasses (or even finely ground figs or dates, to taste) as a healthier sweetener. Note: Any liquid ingredients will make your ketchup a bit thinner.
Plain-Mayo
By Erin Coopey
Watching eggs and oil swirl together and emulsify into thick, creamy mayonnaise seems almost like a magic trick. And the flavor is delightful.
By Erin Coopey
Mix all the ingredients together in a small mixing bowl. Chill until ready to use. Store in the refrigerator for up to one week.
By Erin Coopey
Carolina-style barbecue has a decidedly piquant flavor in comparison to its ketchup-based cousins. This sauce is great with grilled chicken, and it makes a mean pulled-pork sauce. You can even use it as a marinade before grilling. Substitute a ½ cup honey or ½ cup maple syrup for the granulated sugar, if you wish.
Collard-Greens
By Betsy Nelson
This soulful side dish is a nice accompaniment to a roasted chicken. For a vegetarian version, simply omit the ham and, if you like, add a teaspoon of smoked Spanish paprika.
A bowl of BBQ sauce
By Betsy Nelson
Commercial BBQ sauces are often high in sugar, usually in the form of high-fructose corn syrup. This recipe balances the sweetness of caramelized onions, tomatoes, honey, and molasses with the earthiness of cocoa powder. This sauce is best made a day in advance to allow the flavors to meld.
Web-Extra-Pakoras-Recipe
By Betsy Nelson
These little Indian fritters are traditionally made with spinach or other vegetables but are fantastic when made with mustard greens, dandelion greens, watercress, nettles, or arugula. Serve with the yogurt-mint sauce.
Ginger Carrot Relish
By Betsy Nelson
This lacto-fermented relish makes a lovely condiment for Asian-inspired grilled meats and fish, and it is wonderful in a salad, sandwich, or rice-bowl dish. Adapted from Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon.
Summer-Fermented-Veggies
By Betsy Nelson
These tasty lacto-fermented vegetables are great with meals or as a snack. This recipe is inspired by Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon.
Sauerkraut in jar
By Betsy Nelson
You can make this sauerkraut with just one head of cabbage. You don’t need a special crock or a root cellar; it may simply be stored in the refrigerator. This recipe is adapted from Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon.
Wine Vinegar
By Betsy Nelson
Wine vinegar is a great way to use up leftover wine. Red wine produces the fullest flavor, but rosé or white will work as well. This recipe is inspired by Ideas in Food, by Aki Kamozawa and H. Alexander Talbot.
Parsnip fries and beet ketchup
By Betsy Nelson
A creative and healthy alternative to commercial ketchup, which is usually made with high-fructose corn syrup. Try to make this the day before serving so the flavors can meld.
Parsnip fries and beet ketchup
By Betsy Nelson
Want to get really roots-y? Dip these root-veggie fries — parsnips are super, but celery root, parsley root, and rutabagas work, too — into a homemade beet ketchup.
Terikaki-braised-tunrups-and-greens-with-bacon
By Betsy Nelson
East Asia meets the American South in this lively recipe. If your turnips have attached greens, use them instead of the collard greens.
Gratin
By Betsy Nelson
This creamy, comforting gratin is a cinch to make. If crème fraîche is not available, sub heavy whipping cream or sour cream.
Seed-Butter
By Betsy Nelson
Make a peanut-butter alternative with your favorite seeds. Roasting the seeds before blending gives the butter a lovely flavor and color. You could try adding a dash of cinnamon or cocoa powder if you like.
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