skip to Main Content

Latest Stories

a wooden bowl filled with sugar surrounded by sugar cubes
By Catherine Guthrie
Sugar is the top food to avoid when it comes to cancer, according to an integrative oncologist at the University of California San Francisco.
Anika Christ

Vitamin D is the most common micronutrient deficiency — but it’s also one that we can prevent with relative ease. In this mini episode, Anika Christ, RD, CPT, explains why vitamin D is critical to our health, including its role in immunity, and offers ways we can make sure our bodies get optimal levels.

vegetarian Thanksgiving side dishes
By Maddie Augustin
Try these veggie side dishes at your next holiday gathering.
a plate with an open faced egg sandwich
By Catherine Guthrie
Use nutrition to help protect — and fortify — a weakened immune system during cancer treatment.
a person squeezes lemon juice out of a fresh lemon
By Catherine Guthrie
Nourishing yourself while undergoing treatment can be tricky. These foods might help whet your appetite.
spoons and bowls filled with spices
By Helen Martineau
If you want to buy fresh seasonings grown by farmers who are treated fairly, keep these suggestions in mind.
Brussels sprouts
By Kaelyn Riley
Brussels sprouts get a bad rap. When cooked properly, these little crucifers can be delightful.
Katia Smirnov holding a glass
By Katia Smirnov
When one woman began investigating ingredients in her food, she found preservatives, chemicals, and hormones she wasn’t expecting. Her decision to prioritize organic whole foods improved her mood, weight, and overall well-being.
a variety of spices arranged on a cutting board
By Helen Martineau
Prized as global commodities for centuries, spices are experiencing a renaissance. Our experts explain how to source high-quality, fair-trade products to use in your own kitchen.
a woman drinking a glass of water
By Courtney Helgoe
Research suggests alkaline water may help lower blood pressure and cholesterol and moderate the effects of diabetes.
cancer fighting foods: salmon, citrus, nuts, papaya
By Catherine Guthrie
Integrative cancer experts offer ways to nourish yourself when food seems less appealing.
An image of Lindsay Ogden smiling on the left, with an image of Lindsay Ogden coaching someone through an exercise on the right.
By Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT
Learn about this new 30-day digital program designed to help you maintain healthy fitness and nutrition habits despite the obstacles of the holiday season.
a casserole
By Maddie Augustin
Nutritious, comforting recipes designed for leaving on a friend’s doorstep.
a plate of grilled steaks surrounded by plates and bowls of roasted veggies
By Catherine Guthrie
Adding onions and garlic to a meat marinade may offset the risks of heterocyclic amines.
Two mini mummy cauliflower crust pizzas.
By Anika Christ, RD, CPT
No tricks, just tasty Halloween eats.
a person slides slices of onion off a cutting board into a put of water
By Catherine Guthrie
The nutritional health benefits of alliums — think onions, garlic, chives, and shallots — are impressive. Use these kitchen tricks when incorporating them into your diet.
a medley of ancient rice and grains, meat, and roasted veggies
By Stephanie Soucheray
Some people with gluten sensitivities find some ancient wheat grains easier to digest. Here are five to try.
Samantha McKinney and Lindsay Ogden

What do I do if I’m not seeing results? How often do I need to exercise? How many calories should I be eating? Life Time coaches Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT, and Lindsay Ogden, CPT, join us to answer the most common health and fitness questions they hear from our members — including these ones and more.

a carafe filled with Aviva Romm's ginger wellness drink
By Aviva Romm, MD
Mix up this anti-inflammatory wellness drink to give your immune system a boost.
garlic bulbs, onions and scallions
By Catherine Guthrie
What is an allium — and why do you need to eat more of them? Read on for the benefits of onions, garlic, leeks, and more.
An illustration of a man in a bathtub with a hot cup of tea and a book.
By Callie Fredrickson
These ideas can help promote end-of-day relaxation — so you can get a better night’s sleep.
Back To Top