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covid vaccine + covid vaccine = heart

PUMPING IRONY: In Need of a Boost

By Craig Cox
U.S. seniors have rolled up their sleeves for the initial rounds of COVID vaccines at a rate far above average, but as COVID-related deaths among vaccinated Americans continue to rise, public-health officials worry that too many have stopped short of the booster.
a truck driver sits in the driver seat

PUMPING IRONY: Total Recall

By Craig Cox
The thousands of retirees lured back into the workforce by companies desperate for workers are experiencing the kind of job security they could only dream of in pre-pandemic times. They may also be accruing some surprising neurological benefits.
a man in a wheelchair looks at a flight of stairs

PUMPING IRONY: A Formula for Frailty

By Craig Cox
An outing with an elderly friend seems to corroborate recent research weighing the impact of social isolation on the physical fitness of seniors.
wooden game pieces with a blue piece trapped inside a circle of tan pieces and a red one inside a circle of pieces with gaps for escape

PUMPING IRONY: Typecast

By Craig Cox
Can certain personality traits protect us from cognitive dysfunction as we grow old? New research holds out some hope, but I have my doubts.
a pharmacists holds a prescription

PUMPING IRONY: Is There a Pharmacist in the House?

By Craig Cox
The pandemic has pushed pharmacists into primary-care territory traditionally dominated by physicians, and some policymakers believe convenience and expense argue for giving them even more latitude to test and treat. The American Medical Association begs to differ.
A medical professional holds a piggy bank that has a band-aid on its head.

PUMPING IRONY: Home Healthcare Shakeup: Palliative or Predatory?

By Craig Cox
Health-insurance conglomerates are gobbling up home-healthcare companies, despite the industry’s inability to attract and retain workers. Early signs suggest that few of the benefits of these mergers will accrue to caregivers and their elderly clients.
a cat sleeps while snuggling with its owner

PUMPING IRONY: Unsettled by Snoozing?

By Craig Cox
Could regular daytime napping be a precursor to dementia — or even a sign that the disease has already taken hold? A new take on what has generally been considered a salutary practice creates some concerns, despite its caveats. I’m going to try not to lose any sleep over it.
illustration brain and question marks

PUMPING IRONY: Desperate Measures

By Craig Cox
Biogen, the maker of the controversial Alzheimer’s drug Aduhelm, last week released the long-awaited results of two clinical trials — which promptly raised more questions than they answered.
a chalk drawn heart and stethescope

PUMPING IRONY: Better Late Than Never

By Craig Cox
It’s no secret that regular exercise can lower your risk of a heart attack, but new research suggests that the same salutary benefits may apply to those who wait until they hit 70 to start moving.
a calculator and stethoscope rest on a bill

PUMPING IRONY: The Price Is Not Right

By Craig Cox
New polling suggests that Americans — especially seniors — are more stressed than ever about the cost of healthcare. While policymakers struggle in vain to adjust the dynamics that fuel those costs, some of us have chosen to minimize our reliance on the broken system.
a bowl of prunes

PUMPING IRONY: In Praise of the Prune

By Craig Cox
The digestive benefits of prunes are well documented, but recent research suggests they may also help postmenopausal women maintain healthier bones — if they eat enough of them.
a senior man dumps pills from a pill bottle into his hand

PUMPING IRONY: Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out

By Craig Cox
Despite our checkered history with recreational drugs, boomers typically aren’t screened for substance abuse when we visit a doctor. Meanwhile, thousands are dying of overdoses.
a person holds a cut out head with a puzzle piece missing from the center in one hand with the missing piece in the other hand

PUMPING IRONY: Alzheimer’s Research: Hope or Hype?

By Craig Cox
While the Medicare set awaits a final decision on coverage for Biogen’s controversial Alzheimer’s drug, a new study suggests seniors may get the same benefits from regular exercise. Both approaches, however, raise more questions than they answer.
a senior man sits concernedly in front of his computer with hands folded

PUMPING IRONY: High Anxiety

By Craig Cox
Our toxic political climate is contributing to widespread mental-health issues, conditions seniors struggle to overcome because of Medicare’s limited coverage options.
elderly male hands rest on top of a wooden cane

PUMPING IRONY: Going Slow

By Craig Cox
As scientists struggle to create treatment protocols for those coping with long COVID, a new study suggests they shouldn’t ignore long-term mobility issues many seniors face after even a mild case of the virus.
a woman holds a green dumbbell

PUMPING IRONY: Dying to Lose Weight

By Craig Cox
A new survey suggests that dieting for weight loss remains the preferred approach among women who are displeased with their bodies, even as evidence mounts that cutting calories — especially for older women — may do more harm than good.
a person carries a box of donations

PUMPING IRONY: Emotional Baggage

By Craig Cox
Determined to begin culling nearly a half-century of accumulated stuff in our basement, I encounter some fraught emotions and conflicting priorities — and a little holiday magic.
a woman sits in a chair in an assisted living apartment

PUMPING IRONY: Vanishing Act

By Craig Cox
Top-rated nursing homes are often cited for serious health and safety violations that put their residents at risk. But a rigged appeals process keeps those infractions hidden from the public.
a toothbrush sits on a dollar bill

PUMPING IRONY: Toothless

By Craig Cox
Regular dental care is key to overall well-being as we age, but Medicare doesn’t provide coverage. The American Dental Association is fighting tooth and nail to keep it that way.
a person puts a cup into a full dishwasher

PUMPING IRONY: Healthy Housework

By Craig Cox
Recent research suggests that my regular efforts to tidy up the house may help my aging brain and body function more smoothly.
a video camera installed above a living room

PUMPING IRONY: Surveillance State

By Craig Cox
Surveillance technologies can make it easier for the elderly to age in place, but will it mean we’ll see our kids even less often than we do now?
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