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A vial of immunizations next to some blue hospital gowns
By Craig Cox
All indications suggest seniors may be wise to temper their expectations about a forthcoming COVID-19 vaccine.
Woman wearing a mask to protect her from Covid-19
By Michael Dregni
It's all about the "viral inoculum theory," according to infectious-disease experts.
An empty hospital corridor
By Craig Cox
Non-COVID hospital admissions have dropped precipitously since the pandemic struck, leading some to suggest our precautions have somehow made us healthier. I have my doubts.
Map of United States
By Craig Cox
Many factors affect our access to healthcare, but new research suggests that where we choose to live may actually enhance — or limit — our lifespan.
Many paper people around a stethoscope
By Craig Cox
Elderly Americans who volunteer for drug trials seldom make the cut. That makes it more difficult for researchers to know just how their new product will work for folks who often need it the most.
A statin pill and packet
By Craig Cox
Recent research suggests cholesterol-reducing drugs may be safer than once thought and offer cancer- and COVID-fighting benefits. So, why do I remain unconvinced?
Bahram Akradi, the founder, chairman, and CEO of Life Time — Healthy Way of Life.
By Bahram Akradi
A call for alignment on a global scale — for the good of our planet and future generations.
A sad woman looks out the window.
By Craig Cox
While COVID-19 has exacted a huge toll on those coping with a chronic disease, few have suffered more than older adults struggling with dementia.
illustration of a person running to build immunity
By Craig Cox
Exercise is an immune booster, but if you've been exposed to or are recovering from COVID-19, you might want to take it easy, according to a recent analysis.
A needle plunging into a vial
By Craig Cox
As we wait impatiently for a COVID-19 vaccine to free us from the current pandemic, a recent survey indicates surprising skepticism, and healthcare experts suggest we temper our expectations.
Experience Life editor in chief Jamie Martin
By Jamie Martin
In tough times, we tend to move through distinct phases of coping before learning to move ahead.
A 3D rendering of a T cell
By Michael Dregni
Coronavirus antibodies might not be long-lasting, but the latest research has found new hope for battling the virus — your adaptive T cells. And it may lead the way to a vaccine.
Two cups on an outdoor table
By Craig Cox
Six months into the current pandemic, I realize I’ve begun to forget the lessons it’s been trying to teach me.
A woman works out on a rowing machine.
By Craig Cox
New guidelines by the American College of Sports Medicine recommend exercise as a strategy to avoid a severe case of the virus. 
A Black man has a telehealth appointment from his kitchen.
By Craig Cox
The current pandemic has sparked a boom in telemedicine, but a new study notes the many reasons why it’s not a viable option for many seniors.
A Black man does yoga in his bedroom.
By Kaelyn Riley
You may be experiencing a chronic state of stress activation known as “allostatic load.” Our experts offer five techniques to help you de-stress and re-center.
A child takes a ride on his grandfather's back out in the country.
By Craig Cox
Some evidence suggests that young people are carrying the virus into their multigenerational households, triggering the pandemic’s recent surge. Does that mean we should cancel visits from our grandson?
plant growing in center of old tree trunk
By Craig Cox
A pair of new studies suggests that my geezer compatriots — those of us who are still alive, anyway — are actually coping with the pandemic a lot better than you might expect.
A person holds up a knit heart against a setting sun.
By Heidi Wachter
Relationship coach and author Margot Schulman offers practices for building resiliency and deepening our relationships during the coronavirus pandemic and beyond.
An RSVP card for a party
By Craig Cox
Our daughter is planning a big wedding this fall, despite the surging pandemic. This is forcing her geezer parents to make some heartbreaking decisions.
A person uses a walker.
By Craig Cox
My neighbor’s long-sought surgery tempers my desire to see COVID-19 remodel the American healthcare system.
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