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coffee beans, chocolate, and other caffeine products

The amount of caffeine in coffee drinks, including decaf varieties, can vary greatly depending on how they’re made. Though it may seem stronger, a shot of espresso has less caffeine than a cup of brewed coffee. Black tea, meanwhile, has less caffeine than coffee, green tea has less caffeine than black tea, and chocolate has less than all of them.

This chart shows approximately how much caffeine is in some popular beverages and foods. Keep in mind that there will be a lot of variation in these numbers — light-roast coffee has considerably more caffeine than dark roast, for example.

Food/Beverage Serving Size Amount of Caffeine
Dark chocolate 1 ounce (about 1/3 bar) 12 mg
Green tea 12 ounces 40–50 mg
Black tea 12 ounces 60–70 mg
Espresso 1 ounce (one single shot) 75 mg
Caffeinated soda 12 ounces 90–115 mg
Brewed coffee 12 ounces 150 mg
Energy drink 8 ounces 200–300 mg

This was excerpted from “Caffeine!” which was published in the September 2021 issue of Experience Life magazine.

Laine
Laine Bergeson Becco

Laine Bergeson Becco, FMCHC is an Experience Life contributing editor and functional-medicine certified health coach.

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