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Illustration of assorted types of protein, including fish, beans, a steak, egg, and drumstick.
By Gina DeMillo Wagner
You need protein to build muscle, manage your metabolism, and support tissue repair. But how much? What kind? And can you get too much? We answer your top-12 questions about protein.
orange
By Catherine Guthrie
Enriched this, supplemental that. Look behind the hype and you’ll discover that whole foods deliver nutrition that “fragmented” and “isolated” nutrients simply can’t beat.
Vegetable stock
By Andrew Zimmern
Plus, tips on making a nourishing homemade stock and a recipe for one-step chicken stock.
A collage of ghee, pesto, nut butter, and almond milk
By Kaelyn Riley
Skip the additives and preservatives — and save some money — by whipping up these culinary favorites at home.
A stevia leaf and a spoon of powdered stevia
By Stephanie Soucheray
Many health-conscious eaters, paleo bakers, and people with diabetes rely on naturally derived alternative sweeteners — but are they truly better for you than plain table sugar?
An illustration of a person holding a donut on a long piece of sting that looks like a yo-yo.
By Mo Perry
Yo-yo dieting, also known as weight cycling, can be hard on your health. Here are seven potential side effects.
A variety of high-fiber foods, including peas, carrots, and broccoli, are pictured.
By Laine Bergeson Becco, FMCHC
Even a relatively nutritious diet can deliver inadequate amounts of fiber. Learn why it’s so critical to your health — and which foods are high in fiber.
A woman eating cereal while on the phone at a desk in front of a computer.
By Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT
Why under-nourishing your body may be holding you back from achieving your health goals.
5 spoonfuls of ground and whole coffee beans
By Catherine Guthrie
Coffee gets a bad rap, and in excess it can be trouble. But enjoyed in moderation, it has a bright side, too.
Two LT Bowls, filled with chicken, broccoli, and roasted red pepper, and topped with harissa.
By Molly Schelper
This mix-and-match template will help you craft a flavorful, filling, and healthy bowl with key nutrients as your building blocks. Plus, get the recipe for the LifeCafe’s newest bowl to make at home yourself.
A close up of grilled chicken with broccoli florets.
By Life Time Editorial Team
Learn which nutrition habits can help your body shift into a more effective fat-burning state, plus the steps you can take to gradually upgrade the nutrient-density of your meals.
A steak cut into slices on a dark surface.
By Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT
Discover the pros and cons of this trendy concept.
Two slices of avocado sweet potato toast on a plate.
By Molly Schelper
Running low on lunch ideas? These healthy and tasty recipes from Chef Ryan Dodge can all be ready to eat and enjoy in 20 minutes or less.
An over-easy cooked egg inside a piece of bread.
By Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT
A Life Time nutritionist digs into the research behind dietary saturated fat and finds that it’s not the culprit behind heart disease.
A close up of a hand holding a supplement pill in between two fingers.
By Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT
Look for these ingredients to avoid.
A plate of breakfast hash, including eggs, bacon, Brussels sprouts, onion, and more.
By Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT
Eating healthy can be easy — yet overcomplex science often steers us away from getting started. Here are some simple modifications you can implement when it comes elevating your personal nutrition.
Cloves of garlic on table
By Laine Bergeson Becco, FMCHC
Turns out garlic is great for ulcers, food poisoning, and gut dysbiosis. Here's why — and how to get more garlic in your diet.
Dried lentils and assorted beans on a large spoon on top of a wooden surface.
By Molly Schelper
Discover which long-lasting items to keep on hand to easily mix-and-match for multiple healthy meals.
The powdered form of curcumin.
By The Life Time Training Team
This medicinal botanical is one of the oldest, most-studied, and safest on the planet.
Man cutting a banana into slices on a cutting board.
By Nicole Radziszewski
Go light before your workout — and try to eat a postworkout snack within an hour or two of your workout for recovery.
A bowl of protein powder.
By Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT
Why it might be for you — even if you’re not vegan.
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