skip to Main Content
A woman stretching on a hill outside.

The most dramatic seasonal change of the year happens from March to June, as temperatures climb, days lengthen, birds return, and life in all forms comes rushing back. The year’s cycle renews itself in this season of rebirth.

Beneath this outpouring of new life, however, is a near-epic struggle. New growth requires willpower and perseverance. Like a bean seed sprouting from the earth, the spirit of spring is like a pressure valve releasing, priming us for action.

That’s the energy of the season: powerful, creative, determined. Which makes it the perfect time to get serious about your health and fitness.

Write down your workout goal — building new strength or athleticism, perhaps. Then break it down into steps and start working. “What have you been telling yourself you can’t do?” asks wellness coach Kate Larsen, MCC, CWC, NBC-HWC, author of Progress Not Perfection. Spring is the time to question those assumptions and tackle them head-on.

Strength training is perhaps the ideal spring activity. It’s aspirational and challenging for many, and it promotes growth and change. Hiring a trainer — or joining forces with a dedicated partner or group — can help build confidence and accountability, whether you’re an experienced lifter or new to the world of weights. (For a two-month strength program, visit “The Easy-Strength Workout“.)

You can tap into the season’s growth-inducing power by upping the ante in almost any fitness pursuit. If you’re a runner, go for more speed. If you’re a cyclist, attempt longer climbs. If you’re a yogi, strive to master tougher and more athletic asanas.

Whatever you choose, remember that by taking advantage of the opportunities of each season, and avoiding the pitfalls, you can gain a deeper appreciation for your body’s shifting needs — one year, one season, one workout at a time.

This originally appeared as “Move Through the Seasons” in the July/August 2018 print issue of Experience Life.

Andrew
Andrew Heffernan

Andrew Heffernan, CSCS, is an Experience Life contributing editor.

Thoughts to share?

ADVERTISEMENT

More Like This

Back To Top
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]