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soaking and sprouting
  1. Soak your beans, grains, nuts, or seeds in water (1:2 food-to-water ratio) at room temperature for the amount of time specified in the chart below. You can add 1 to 2 tablespoons of apple-cider vinegar to further break down antinutrients.
  2. Drain the liquid, and cook grains or beans normally if soaking is your final step. Eat your nuts or seeds, turn them into nut or seed milk, or grind them into a butter.
  3. To sprout, rinse your grains, beans, nuts, or seeds after soaking; drain the liquid slowly, leaving some moisture. Rinse and drain at least twice a day, at minimum, until they begin to sprout (seeds, legumes, oats) or split (nuts and rice); refrigerate and eat within two to three days.

Seed Soaking and Sprouting Time Chart

seed-soaking-times-chart
This was excerpted from “All About Antinutrients” which was published in Experience Life magazine.

Illustration by: Stuart Bradford

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