skip to Main Content
A prescription form with a stethoscope and a pen

As you probably know by now, I am a huge proponent of becoming an active participant in your healthcare. This can begin with asking the following questions when your doctor recommends a drug.

15 Questions to Ask About Prescriptions

  1. What does this medication do?
  2. How, when and for how long should I take it?
  3. Is this drug intended to cure my underlying condition or is it intended to give me relief from my symptoms?
  4. What are the side effects? Are they minor or major? Common or rare?
  5. Is it safe take while pregnant or breastfeeding? (If appropriate to you.)
  6. Have long-term studies been done on this drug? Have studies been done for this drug on the elderly or women? (If appropriate to you.) Ask this especially if you are going to take the drug long-term.
  7. Do the benefits outweigh the risks?
  8. Is this dosage individualized for me, or is this a one-dose-fits-all dosage?
  9. Would it be possible to start me at a lower dose and adjust it according to my response?
  10. What herbs, supplements, foods, drinks, or activities should I avoid while taking this medication?
  11. Is it safe for me to take this medication with other drugs or supplements I am taking?
  12. Will any tests be necessary while I am taking this medication?
  13. What should I do if I miss a dose of this medication? Take it immediately when I remember, or wait until my next regularly scheduled dose?
  14. Is there a generic version of the medication?
  15. What are my non-drug alternatives?

Thoughts to share?

This Post Has 0 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

City and state are only displayed in our print magazine if your comment is chosen for publication.

ADVERTISEMENT

More Like This

nsaids
By Kristin Ohlson
How NSAIDS — nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and aspirin — can cause more pain than they relieve.
illustration of a slumped, sad looking man holding a slice of pizza
By Michael Dregni
This is your body on foods that are more processed, have higher levels of sugar, and contain fewer nutrients.
What Your Body Is Trying to Tell You Female
By Anjula Razdan
How to read the telltale clues of health imbalances — and what you can do about them.
Back To Top