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A 100-dollar bill covered in pills
By Craig Cox
With the White House pushing Congress to allow the government to negotiate drug pricing, Big Pharma wonders, Where’s the love?
A person works at an office.
By Craig Cox
Recent research suggests that postponing my retirement might be good for my aging brain.
A woman using both of her hands to massage her jaw line.
By Julie Dulude
Experts weigh in on this anti-aging trend — and offer a few exercises you can try at home.
A kid holds an iPad.
By Craig Cox
A fraught battle with our 4-year-old grandson over screen time has forced Grandma and Grandpa to admit that his customary weekly visits may now hold less allure for him — and us — than they once did.
A Medicare enrollment form with a stethoscope on it
By Craig Cox
For reasons both political and pecuniary, attempts to expand Medicare benefits have always been a tough sell, despite the rising demands of an aging population. As Congress prepares to give it another shot, I’m hedging my bets.
A woman holds red wooden heart next to her pelvis.
By Aviva Romm, MD
The menstrual cycle holds many clues to a woman’s overall health. Here’s how to identify what’s normal for you — and when to seek help.
A pair of black glasses with a vision chart in the background
By Craig Cox
At a time when impaired vision among the senior set is beginning to alarm some public-health experts, a surprising change in my own eyesight has me scrambling to get a better view of things.
a cup of hot green tea
By Craig Cox
Drinking green tea at least three times a week is associated with a lower risk of heart disease and stroke, according to recent research.
Two wooden houses
By Craig Cox
Concerned that they may be called upon to provide full-time caregiving someday if a late-life romance leads to cohabitating, many older couples are choosing to follow their hearts — while maintaining separate residences.
an arrangement of calla lillies
By Maggie Fazeli Fard
Death-positivity can help us reframe the end of life.
A person shows his ears.
By Craig Cox
With my hearing aids on the fritz, I suddenly find myself rooting for scientists seeking a way to genetically manipulate the malfunctioning human ear.
a man uses a rowing machine
By Michael Dregni and Maggie Fazeli Fard
Moving your body can help you sharpen your focus, improve your mood, and more.
Prescriptions around some drugs
By Craig Cox
The “deprescribing” movement faces various obstacles as advocates seek to gain some influence amid our drug-happy healthcare system, not the least of which is simply getting your doctor’s attention.
A person on a boat looks at the water.
By Craig Cox
If stress can lead to graying hair, can periods of calm reverse the process? Recent research suggests it may have that effect, though my graying locks are probably beyond help.
A person ties their shoes.
By Craig Cox
Late-blooming runners are routinely beating veteran racers at the national level, raising questions about the toll decades of training exact on the body — and why we choose to run (or not) in the first place.
A doctor looks at a brain scan.
By Craig Cox
The controversy surrounding the FDA’s approval of the first new Alzheimer’s drug in nearly two decades will do little to temper demand by desperate patients and their caregivers. It may also exacerbate racial disparities among those vying for the treatment.
An illustration of a man sitting on a tightrope.
By Anika Christ, RD, CPT
Plus, solutions to help correct them.
A welcome sign on a store window
By Craig Cox
Emerging from social isolation, I’m discovering the importance of patience and empathy while gradually reconnecting to friends, family, and an eerily familiar postpandemic world.
a person gripping their wrist
By Craig Cox
Could replacing cartilage be the key to ending arthritic joint pain?
A hospital building is pictured.
By Craig Cox
The pandemic has persuaded the U.S. healthcare industry to reimagine some aspects of its operations in ways that may yield significant benefits for the elderly. Will those revelations survive a return to normalcy?
A ripped piece of paper that spells out Parkinson's disease
By Craig Cox
Cases of the debilitating neurological disease have been surging in recent years and some researchers suggest COVID-19 may accelerate the trend.
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