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Two wooden houses
By Craig Cox
Concerned that they may be called upon to provide full-time caregiving someday if a late-life romance leads to cohabitating, many older couples are choosing to follow their hearts — while maintaining separate residences.
an arrangement of calla lillies
By Maggie Fazeli Fard
Death-positivity can help us reframe the end of life.
A person shows his ears.
By Craig Cox
With my hearing aids on the fritz, I suddenly find myself rooting for scientists seeking a way to genetically manipulate the malfunctioning human ear.
a man uses a rowing machine
By Michael Dregni and Maggie Fazeli Fard
Moving your body can help you sharpen your focus, improve your mood, and more.
Prescriptions around some drugs
By Craig Cox
The “deprescribing” movement faces various obstacles as advocates seek to gain some influence amid our drug-happy healthcare system, not the least of which is simply getting your doctor’s attention.
A person on a boat looks at the water.
By Craig Cox
If stress can lead to graying hair, can periods of calm reverse the process? Recent research suggests it may have that effect, though my graying locks are probably beyond help.
A person ties their shoes.
By Craig Cox
Late-blooming runners are routinely beating veteran racers at the national level, raising questions about the toll decades of training exact on the body — and why we choose to run (or not) in the first place.
A doctor looks at a brain scan.
By Craig Cox
The controversy surrounding the FDA’s approval of the first new Alzheimer’s drug in nearly two decades will do little to temper demand by desperate patients and their caregivers. It may also exacerbate racial disparities among those vying for the treatment.
An illustration of a man sitting on a tightrope.
By Anika Christ, RD, CPT
Plus, solutions to help correct them.
A welcome sign on a store window
By Craig Cox
Emerging from social isolation, I’m discovering the importance of patience and empathy while gradually reconnecting to friends, family, and an eerily familiar postpandemic world.
a person gripping their wrist
By Craig Cox
Could replacing cartilage be the key to ending arthritic joint pain?
A hospital building is pictured.
By Craig Cox
The pandemic has persuaded the U.S. healthcare industry to reimagine some aspects of its operations in ways that may yield significant benefits for the elderly. Will those revelations survive a return to normalcy?
A ripped piece of paper that spells out Parkinson's disease
By Craig Cox
Cases of the debilitating neurological disease have been surging in recent years and some researchers suggest COVID-19 may accelerate the trend.
A smiling woman sits on a rock by a waterfall.
By Craig Cox
Memories of a former colleague — and recent research — remind me that an upbeat view of aging may pay healthy dividends well into our later years.
A pamphlet for Medicare
By Craig Cox
Navigating the Medicare enrollment process should be easy. It is not.
A puzzle based on the $100 bill
By Craig Cox
Financial stress during middle age can create physical pain in your later years, according to a new study. My own family’s experience suggests healing is possible.
A stethoscope on a check from the United States Treasury
By Craig Cox
COVID has drawn fresh attention to our broken long-term-care system, sparking some ambitious government initiatives. But recent research suggests there’s much more work to be done.
Someone left the keys in the refrigerator.
By Craig Cox
The latest thinking on Alzheimer’s disease suggests we may slow its development with diet and lifestyle shifts, but a recent harrowing experience has me wondering whether my brain is already too far gone — or if I just need to pay better attention to what I’m doing.
Two birds over a couple of orange halves.
By Craig Cox
Like many empty nesters, I often wonder what role I should be playing in my adult children’s lives. An unexpected visit from our daughter after months of silence provided some clarity.
A variety of medical tools
By Craig Cox
A prediabetes diagnosis can trigger all sorts of nightmarish scenarios, but mounting evidence suggests that seniors are a lot less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than we’ve been led to believe.
a dog looks forlornly out a window
By Alexandra Smith, MA, LPCC
Here's how to maintain social connections — even amid a pandemic.
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