skip to Main Content
Girls' Sports

When girls sit on the sidelines, they miss out on more than working up a sweat. All kids who play sports are less likely to develop chronic health issues like obesity and type 2 diabetes. But they may also have an inside track on educational and job prospects — and those impacts are particularly profound for young girls.

A 2015 study by the Women’s Sports Foundation found that female athletes are more likely to excel in high school science and math than nonathletes. By playing, they also hone their collaboration, communication, and leadership skills.

All these characteristics can lead to enhanced education and career opportunities. In a 2014 survey by EY’s Women Athletes Business Network and espnW, 74 percent of the participating 400 adult women agreed that playing youth sports can later help accelerate a woman’s career; indeed, 61 percent said it contributed to their own career success.

So if you want the young girls in your life to have a better chance at calling the shots down the road — and to be healthier and more confident at all ages — encourage them to include a sport or two in their game plan.

Thoughts to share?

This Post Has 0 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

City and state are only displayed in our print magazine if your comment is chosen for publication.

ADVERTISEMENT

More Like This

Digital-Dementia
By Heidi Wachter
Research shows our growing use of digital devices can affect sleep quality, obesity risk, aggressive behavior and "digital dementia".
Kids Soccer Team
By Chris Ballard
Many children simply don’t have fun playing sports anymore. Here’s a plan to reverse the “adultification” of youth athletics.
By Maggie Fazeli Fard
Compassion is a cornerstone of education at Atlanta's Dunbar Elementary School, a partner of the Dikembe Mutombo Foundation.
Back To Top