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BREAKFAST

  • Throw some frozen raspberries or strawberries and a handful of greens (spinach or mixed salad greens), along with half a banana, into your smoothie.
  • Instead of pairing your eggs with hash browns and toast, try adding a side of black beans and salsa.
  • Cook up a big batch of steel-cut oats over the weekend and reheat some each morning with a little chopped-up apple and toasted pecans.

LUNCH

  • Look for healthy prepared salads at the grocery store that use whole grains and layer them over a base of mixed greens.
  • Opt for legume-based soups at the grocery-story hot bar.
  • Eat at ethnic restaurants, such as Indian and Mexican locales, which tend to give legumes more of a starring role.

DINNER

  • Start out dinner with a bountiful raw vegetable salad.
  • Replace starchy side dishes with legumes.
  • Sautéing some veggies? Start out with a little garlic and onion.

SNACK

  • Pack a small bag of nuts, such as almonds, pistachios, or walnuts, or seeds, such as pumpkin seeds, in your bag or car.
  • Whip up a big batch of black-bean dip to have on hand for tortilla chips and raw veggies.
  • Keep it simple: Eat a piece of fruit, like an apple, orange, or banana.

 

This article was adapted from “Fiber: Why It Matters More Than You Think” in the 2010 issue of Experience Life magazine.

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