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Pumping Irony

A woman has a virtual conversation.
By Craig Cox
Who knew that our springtime of social isolation could spark so much conviviality?
An empty bench.
By Craig Cox
A brief outing to the grocery store demonstrates how the current pandemic can both test and heal us — if we remain open to all its lessons.
A man sits on a couch and stares out the window.
By Craig Cox
The COVID-19 pandemic is forcing millions of elderly Americans to stay at home, where they’re forced to confront another major health challenge: loneliness.
A backlit picture of a green leaf
By Craig Cox
Words matter when you’re facing a serious illness, and the traditional “risk-versus-benefit” approach to treatment options doesn’t always lead to the healthiest choices.
An elderly person holds a glass of water.
By Craig Cox
Recent research suggesting that poor hydration may be impairing cognitive function in older women has me wondering why thirst-averse geezers like me are somehow spared.
A picture of a stethoscope and a Medicare form
By Craig Cox
A recent shift in Medicare reimbursement policies is roiling the home-healthcare industry. It should give pause to folks banking on a single-payer solution to our busted system.
A figure shaped like an "8" on its side and made of seeds
By Craig Cox
A renowned genetics pioneer argues that medical advances will someday allow humans to live well past 100 years. I can’t help wondering what would be lost in the process.
A young boy measures himself against a wall.
By Craig Cox
Danish researchers suggest that my diminutive stature as a youth makes it more likely I’ll develop dementia. I think they may be short-sighted.
A person rides their bike in the winter.
By Craig Cox
New Zealand researchers have found that bicycling to work may enhance your longevity. My own experience suggests they may be ignoring the possibility of fatal collisions.
Two hands grasp each other.
By Craig Cox
New research on muscle mass and heart disease reminds me of a harsh lesson my dad taught me long ago: Never assume anything. 
A person in a hospital bed calls for assistance via a remote.
By Craig Cox
The nation is facing an unprecedented nursing shortage just as new evidence suggests that a nurse-led approach may improve the care of our elders.
A person works on a car engine.
By Craig Cox
Results of a new study threaten to upend decades of longevity research and perhaps require physicians to act more like car mechanics.
A curve in the road and a traffic sign are pictured.
By Craig Cox
Mysterious aches and pain are always going to erupt as we grow older; it doesn’t mean we’re doomed to a future of frailty.
A piggy bank with glasses
By Craig Cox
My path to retirement has long been littered with financial obstacles. Recent research suggests that may not be such a bad thing.
A rectangular red box is surrounded by Christmas ribbons.
By Craig Cox
We were determined not to exchange Christmas gifts this year. Then reality intervened.
An open bottle of aspirin
By Craig Cox
Just as new research warns heart-healthy older folks that taking aspirin to prevent a heart attack could be fatal, another study suggests regular doses could fend off cancer. I just wish it would work when I get a headache.
A person reaching for keys
By Craig Cox
Because we’re all living longer lives, longevity visionaries suggest we need to rethink societal norms around aging. I have my doubts that social engineering is the answer.
A hand drawing stick figures on a chalkboard
By Craig Cox
Robust social connections are key to our well-being as we age, so should I worry that my circle of friends has been narrowing for years? Not so much.
An empty hospital bed is pictured.
By Craig Cox
Government attempts to curb falls in the hospital have limited mobility so much that elderly patients often head home in worse shape than when they arrived.
An open road with the words PAST, PRESENT, and FUTURE superimposed on it
By Craig Cox
While some of my geezer contemporaries are taking offense at Generation Z’s campaign to blame us for the state of the world, I say bring it on.
An atmospheric shot of hearing aids
By Craig Cox
There’s plenty of evidence showing that hearing loss can damage our quality of life as we grow older, but the senior set — including my brother — seems immune to the warnings. 
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