skip to Main Content

Straight From the Coaches: Your Health & Fitness Questions, Answered

With Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT & Lindsay Ogden, CPT

Season 4, Episode 7 | October 19, 2021

What do I do if I’m not seeing results? How often do I need to exercise? How many calories should I be eating? Life Time coaches Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT, and Lindsay Ogden, CPT, join us to answer the most common health and fitness questions they hear from our members — including these ones and more.

Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT, is a Master Trainer at Life Time who supports members and nutrition programming.

Lindsay Ogden, CPT, is a nutrition coach and the digital manager for content and coaching at Life Time.

These are some of the most frequently asked questions that Ogden and McKinney field in the coaching inbox from members. Listen to the full episode to hear them dive deeper into their answers. 

  • “I’m not seeing results. What should I do?” Foundational, healthy habits take time to establish and require consistency in order to see results. “Steady doesn’t make a great story, but it doesn’t make it any less true,” says Ogden. Think of your health like a puzzle: Those core habits are big pieces we all have in common and need in place, but you may also have some smaller pieces subject to your individuality that you need to fit in to put the entire puzzle together.
  • “What’s the difference between a workout and a program?” Workouts are any activities that get you moving — kayaking, a studio class, interval sprints. Programming uses exercise science to progress you toward a certain goal. Workouts can plug into programs, but when you start consistently subbing them in, that’s when you may not get the intended results from your program.
  • “How much weight should I be losing?” This question requires an individualized assessment. What’s your body composition now? What’s your exercise history? What’s your nutrition like? Have you had blood testing lately? Are your hormones OK? How much are you sleeping? How stressed are you? Weight is a fleeting number, and there are many reasons why it’ll change and fluctuate. It’s important to look at your true goal — beyond just weight — as well as understand the difference between weight loss and fat loss.
  • “Does lifting weights make you bulky?” “Nobody — literally nobody — gets bulky by accident,” says McKinney. There’s a very specific way you need to eat and train for bulkiness to happen if that is your goal. She has been working with clients for over 15 years and says she’s never once had a client who’s put on muscle and lean mass and be unhappy with how they feel and look.
  • “How often do you really need to exercise?” “Master the art of showing up,” suggests Ogden. You don’t want to go to an unsustainable extreme right away. Understand your starting point and build on it with consistency. Change your mindset from looking at exercise as something you do when you’re motivated to something you show up for everyday regardless of whether you feel like it.
  • “Do I need to take supplements or is food alone good enough?” McKinney emphasizes focusing on food first, though she suggests thinking of it as how hard or easy you want your program to be. You don’t have to take supplements, but high-quality supplements will support your body in the healthy efforts you’re trying to make.
  • “How many calories should I be eating?” If you’re eating a nutrient-dense diet and foods in the right balance, it’s nearly impossible to overeat on calories. Whole, unprocessed foods — such as quality protein, lots of vegetables, high-fiber fruits, healthy fats, and complex carbohydrates — are really filling. While calories do matter, obsessively tracking them is not the best approach.

ADVERTISEMENT

More Like This

Samantha McKinney
With Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT
Season 3, Episode 3   April 6, 2021

Metabolism is more complex than simply being “fast” or “slow” or controlled by exercise. There are many things we can do in our daily lives to optimize it. Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT, shares how to build the foundation for a healthy metabolism, as well as ways to dig deeper if you’re not seeing results or feeling your best.

Listen >
Lindsay Ogden
With Lindsay Ogden
Season 3, Episode 2   March 30, 2021

Results are a lagging indicator of our habits. Lindsay Ogden, CPT, nutrition coach, walks us through her four-step process — what she calls the IPTR method — for developing lasting health habits, so you have the know-how and a tactical plan to go after your goals.

Listen >
Samantha McKinney
With Samantha McKinney, RD
Season 4, Episode 5   October 5, 2021

Thyroid issues are prevalent: An estimated one in seven people are affected, with even more suffering from an imbalance — and many not even aware that their thyroid is behind their symptoms. Samantha McKinney, RD, CPT, shares the signals our thyroid might be sending us, the tests to ask for, and the lifestyle habits we can implement in our daily lives to nourish and support our thyroids.

Listen >

Transcript: Straight From the Coaches: Your Health & Fitness Questions, Answered

Season 7, Episode 7  | October 19, 2021

Jamie Martin

Welcome to Life Time Talks, the healthy-living podcast that’s aimed at helping you achieve your health, fitness, and life goals. I’m Jamie Martin, editor-in-chief of Experience Life, Life Time’s whole-life health and fitness magazine.

David Freeman

And I’m David Freeman, Life Time’s national digital performer brand leader. We’re all in different places along our health and fitness journey, but no matter what we are working toward, there are some essential things we can do to keep moving in the direction of a healthy, purpose-driven life.

Jamie Martin

In each episode, we’ll break down the various elements of healthy living, including fitness and nutrition, mindset and community, and health issues. We’ll also share real inspiring stories of transformation.

David Freeman

And we’ll be talking to experts from Life Time and beyond, who’ll share their insights and knowledge, so you’ll have the tools and information you need to take charge of your next steps. Here we go.

[MUSIC]

David Freeman

I’m David Freeman.

Jamie Martin

And I’m Jamie Martin. And we have an episode unlike any other we’ve ever done so far, at least to date. We are bringing in a couple of our Life Time coaches, to answer some of the common questions they receive around health and fitness. So you’ll recognize, actually, both of our guests today. Samantha McKinney is a registered dietician and master trainer at Life Time, who supports members and nutrition programming.

David Freeman

And we also have Lindsey Ogden, to round out this dynamic duo. Lindsey comes to us as a certified personal trainer and nutrition coach and is the digital manager of content coaching at Life Time. So let’s go into it. Like, what are you excited about within this episode?

Jamie Martin

Well I think we hear from our members and people who are interested in healthy living all the time with these questions that seem to repeat themselves, right? Like they keep coming over again and again. And I’m excited to just get some answers. I know we probably know the answers, as people who live in this health and wellness space. But to be able to provide some of this content and this information, back to our audience and to those people who have asked and are looking for additional support, I think that’s the opportunity with this episode.

David Freeman

Yeah, I want everybody, right now, to get your pen out. You hear that? Get your pen out. Get your paper. Take the notes. Because it’s one thing to actually know, we always talk about applying what it is that they’re going to answer. So make sure you write down some of these answers and start to apply. Little by little and being consistent is what’s going to be key.

Jamie Martin

Yeah, absolutely. And they both come with so much knowledge in different spaces. If you remember back, I mean Sam has been here. She’s going to be talking about thyroid health this season. She’s already been here, talking about metabolism. Lindsay’s talked about habits. And so they each bring this kind of unique specialty areas and knowledge areas that, I don’t know, every time I’ve talked to them, I’ve walked away with, OK, here’s my to do list of items and things and resources to go check out and learn more about. So.

David Freeman

Yeah, well. Talking about frequently asked questions, I got a question for you. Are you ready to go?

Jamie Martin

I’m ready to go.

David Freeman

Alright, let’s get into it.

Jamie Martin

Let’s go.

[MUSIC]

Jamie Martin

Sam and Lindsay, welcome back to Life Time Talks. Thanks for being here.

Lindsay Ogden

Thank you for having me back. It’s been a while.

Samantha McKinney

Yeah, same here. Thanks for having us.

David Freeman

So what’s been going on?

Lindsay Ogden

We’ve been busy. I mean, we’ve been doing a lot with the new digital programs. A lot of coaching going on between the two of us.

Samantha McKinney

Yeah, you know, Life Time’s got a great offering for transformation programs and exercise programs, all offered virtually. So Lindsey and I are part of that team. It’s been super fun.

Jamie Martin

Well, that’s part of the reason we wanted to bring you guys back on. You guys are connected with our members a lot, get a lot of questions coming in from all over the country, people who are participating in different programs. And I know you two, recently, were having a conversation among yourselves about all these questions. And you had a conversation, like, we should have recorded that.

Samantha McKinney

Yeah, I mean, it was so —  Lindsey and I, just for a little bit of background, are part of the coaching team, that interacts, and is able to answer in the chat feature. And there are several different program offerings that we have. And we were just noticing themes of questions that come up a lot. And we are just kind of chatting about it and sort of sharing a little bit of the background and stories of hey, this particular person is asking this or that.

And we just —  I mean this is, I wouldn’t want to speak for both of us, like this is our passion. Right? Like health and fitness. And we just like went off on this tangent. I’m like, I wonder if that would have been helpful for people to hear. And so I think that was kind of the genesis of this whole conversation.

Jamie Martin

Yeah, I think Molly happened to like —  Molly is our producer for anyone who’s listening. She happened to reach out to you guys a day or two later and like perfect, we can actually make this happen.

David Freeman

So magic. Magical Molly is I like to call her. So just give everybody a recap as far as, if it is the first time listening and you did not hear some of the podcast in the past, so we had Sam on. She dropped a wealth of knowledge around gut health, metabolism, and thyroid. And Lindsay got us all straight with some habits. Alright? So let’s jump right into it. And some commonly asked questions, yeah? So, first one. I’m not seeing results. What should I do?

Lindsay Ogden

Yes. I think this is —  I mean, people get frustrated. And we understand that. They’re here because they want to make change. And I think they want that change to happen sooner than later. But we know, from being in the industry for a long time, those foundational habits and those healthy habits, they take time, one, to establish.

And two, to see results from, got to stay consistent with them. So I know, Sam, you get this question a lot. And she does a really good job of pulling back the layers. So like, you can talk about some of the protein stuff.

Samantha McKinney

Sure. Well I would say, whenever we talk about habits and you start to implement things, it is, I mean, I think you hit the nail on the head. First and foremost is about having patients, which I think a lot of us in life just don’t have, right? Like we implement change and we want to see changes happen right now.

That could be in regards to a body transformation program, that could be something financial, it could be any type of self-development thing, right? And we just want it to be immediate. But more importantly, I would say that, in regards to kind of some of the specifics though, the answer that I give that’s the most honest one and probably the most frustrating one is, it depends. Right?

It’s so, why am I not seeing results? Really depends. Right? There’s no black and white answer to that, which is what’s really hard. There are certain foundational things, and I don’t know. I have this analogy, and this is part of where we were going with our conversation, I have this analogy about a puzzle. Alright?

So bear with me, tell me if you’re kind of tracking with this. So when we start to actually look at the nuts and bolts of what somebody is doing to try to elicit change, let’s assume, for the sake of this particular example, that it’s either muscle gain or body fat loss. Some sort of body composition transformation. Imagine that, for it to happen for you, you have to put a puzzle together.

And once all the pieces are together, then that’s when the results start happening. Well, there are some core pieces that apply to everybody. So it could be, assuming no underlying health conditions, it would be like a gram of protein per pound of ideal body weight. It could be half of your body weight in ounces of water per day.

Could be sleep. It could be strength training at least 3 days a week. Like those are some examples of puzzle pieces that we all have. However, to put the whole puzzle together, we might have some different pieces at play. I might need to give up dairy, whereas you might need to intermittent fast, whereas you might need to go Keto, and then you might need to do more HIIT training.

And that’s where it starts to get really confusing, because people start to look at their friends and their neighbors and their cousins. And they’re like well, why is it working for you and not for me? It depends. There’s a lot of factors, what’s going on underneath the surface. But I always go back to those big puzzle pieces and what I find is, usually those aren’t even in place consistently.

Jamie Martin

Are there certain phases in someone’s life where that question comes up more often? Where people, if they’re not seeing results —  woman in menopause for instance, or other phases where this is common?

Lindsay Ogden

Yeah. I mean, I would say, in general, there’s seasons of life. And menopause being one of them, right? But what worked for you in the past may not work for you now. And I think that’s where the big frustration comes in. It’s like, maybe people did do keto. And their first time around, they did lose weight. Most of that being water weight.

And then they try it again. It’s like, oh I’m not getting the same results. So it’s like, what works you then may not work for you, because you’re a different person. We’re literally changing by the minute, so it is that constant experiment. And I think, with those puzzle pieces, it’s the adherence and the consistency. Like it’s not enough to say, Oh I did this and this for a week.

Like you got to stay consistent with it to let that piece settle before you put in another piece. So I think that’s the other piece, too, when you were talking is the adherence and consistency of putting that together. And then I know you have more around the menopause piece, too.

Samantha McKinney

Yeah, I mean, we can kind of go down that road. But I almost don’t want to skip over that whole analogy of those big puzzle pieces. I cannot —  I will say, no joke. 99.9% of the members that we’ve interacted with that have said, hey I’m doing this program and I’m not seeing the results that I expected to see or things aren’t moving the way that I want —  they are not hitting their protein targets.

They just aren’t. And it’s something that I take is information as a coach, of like, OK, well, what can we do to really make sure that we can highlight that and make that easier? And we have different recipes and things that we provide across the programs.

But sometimes I think that human nature, the more often you hear something, that instead of amplifying the importance, it almost dilutes it. It’s almost like, yeah, yeah, I know. I need to hit my protein. But like should I intermittent fast? And like back up. Back up a little bit. The reason that we talk about it so much is because it works.

Lindsay Ogden

Or like the sleep is another big one like that too. Like people be like, I’m so tired and this that and other with my schedule and my kids. And it’s like, well how’s your sleep quality and quantity? And they’re like oh I get good enough. I’m like about 6. And it’s like, there’s just like those big puzzle pieces, that if you’re not hitting on consistently, you’re missing the forest for the trees.

Like you’re focusing on the wrong things sometimes, like jumping, leaping, taking bounds over those foundational things that they need to be there.

Samantha McKinney

Yeah, and like what I want to add on to that, is that I really feel for people. I do. I mean, we are getting hit left and right through, like, whether it’s social media or news or whatever, about all these new things to be doing and I appreciate, in my heart, like, I feel the confusion, right? That these participants might be feeling.

And so sometimes it’s just kind of repeating some of —  I know it sounds boring. I’m aware it sounds boring. I don’t like boring either. Right? That type of a thing. But I almost want that to be almost a beacon of positivity, of listen, there’s always going to be a trend and there’s usually some sort of grain of truth in all those trends.

There’s a time and place to do keto. There’s a time and place to intermittent fast. But it doesn’t replace some of those basics that nutrition science has shown consistently over and over again apply to most people.

Jamie Martin

It can feel like you’re a unbroken record, right? Like I’m saying the same thing again and again. I often say that when we’re doing articles for the magazine, like, we say the same four things in most articles. Because they’re foundational. Right? They’re those big pieces of the puzzle.

David Freeman

Yeah, let me make it a little personal. Can I make it a little personal?

Samantha McKinney

Please do.

David Freeman

Yes, OK. So, Lindsay, you ended up putting up a post and, Sam, you just referenced it. Social media. We’re being fed all these different things. And this post that you put up was so, so on point. Can you tell us a little bit about it? It was talking about before and after pictures. Walk us through what that message was and why that all came up for you, personally.

Lindsay Ogden

Yeah. I think, right now, it’s very hot topic of body image, body positivity. Not having before and afters. I think it was Pinterest that banned before and afters. I think there are good things about before and after pictures. I think it’s a way to document your journey, a way to share your journey. It’s data beyond numbers.

But my big thing is titling as after. Because I think people look at one an image and if they can’t get to that end image then they’re a failure. And also, they’re assigning an end date or a finish line to something that is ongoing, literally until you die. Health and fitness is always evolving. You’re always learning.

You’re always going to be growing through it. And if you assign this after — I highly doubt anyone’s taken an after picture and been like done. I don’t have to exercise again. I don’t have to eat right again. Like, I’ve arrived and I am here forever. No, they set a new goal and then they go for that. So I think that’s the thing with diets, too.

Like, you think of a clear start and end date and it’s like, well what’s the after? I’m very much a fan of like, hey, I’m going to do a detox. That’s great. But what’s your plan after? Otherwise you are just living your life and these start and stop chunks. And it’s like, you’re going to end up going to the same place you were before.

You have to have a more sustainable approach. And again, that goes back to experimenting and being adhere and consistent. Again, you keep saying the same things over and over and I —  a quote came into my head that I heard recently and it said, steady doesn’t make a great story, but it doesn’t make it less true.

So whether it’s the boring things or the study things, like, yeah. Maybe they’re not like the shiny, flashy, sexy things, but it doesn’t make it less true. Like anything, I think it’s more true at the end of the day.

David Freeman

Going there. And the reason why I said I want to make it personal. I think we usually talk at our clients as far as what we’ve been through, or who we worked with. So taking it back to you and making it personal, you’re now coming from a place of experience. And it took you time to get there. Even where you’re at right now and how well-versed you are within this space, how long did that take for you?

Lindsay Ogden

Years. I mean, I will be honest and say I’ve never thought of myself of having like weight issues. But I’ve had goals and I’ve wanted to get them. And that’s required hard work and discipline and consistency. And that’s for anyone who has a goal. I think what you’re hitting on is in the, I would say, social media space, a lot of people do speak from their experience, which is great and you need to share those stories.

But as a Coach that’s where hearing other’s stories comes into play. And I think that’s something that we really value within our ability to Coach people across the country. It’s like, just sometimes asking the questions gives them the answers. Because I think they’re so used to, here’s how you do this or here’s what I did. And then again, that frustration may come in. It’s like, let’s ask the questions. Let them have the win. Don’t give them the win. Have them come to the realization and have that win.

Samantha McKinney

For sure. And there’s a couple of things that you hit on that I think would be good for us to explore in this conversation. One, as you were saying like, hey it’s not —  I think you referenced the after photos, really progress photos. And so, really, this is tracking how you’re progressing towards your goal.

So if you’re in a program, I really do encourage you to sit down and make sure that you’re writing down sort of the deeper motivation as to why you’re even making change. Change is inherently hard, right? And then make sure you’re tracking parameters that are relevant to that change.

So for example, let’s say, really, your deep change, if you really stop to think about it, if you’re like, OK, I’ve seen my parents and my grandparents really struggle with uncontrolled diabetes and that has been devastating to my family and I want to avoid that. You know, OK, weight might be something to track, but maybe it’s a little bit more around blood sugar, right?

And maybe it’s more about waist to hip circumference, et cetera. And so when we talk about progress tracking, it’s sometimes I’ll —  we’ve gotten messages before, too, where people will be like, OK, you know, I’m in a smaller size pants and I’m sleeping better and my energy is higher and my cravings are gone but, like, the scales the same.

And I’m like congratulations. You know, that’s awesome. You know what I mean? And we also live in a society, although things are starting to change a little bit, people focus almost exclusively on pound loss. And I think actually, even in one of the articles on Experience Life, I said it tongue in cheek, but I was like, OK, you could lose weight by cutting off your arm.

Does that matter? Does the scale weight really matter? Or what is actually really meaningful to you? And spending time thinking about that. Because what a lot of people don’t realize when they message in is that they actually are progressing towards their goals, in great strides, and they’re almost missing the opportunity to celebrate that.

Jamie Martin

It just looks different than expected.

Lindsay Ogden

Yep. With the scale example, too, people will say a number. They have a number in mind. And normally, there’s a place that they’ve been to in their life where they were that number and they were happier than, right? So they’re trying to get back to that state. So when they say like I have 20 pounds I want to lose.

So I’m like, Alright, let’s say you lose that 20 pounds. If you are not having good energy, if you are having a lot of cravings, if you’re not sleeping well, if all these other things aren’t going well, but you hit that goal weight, are you happy then? No, it’s all those other things that you’re happy about, you just attach it to a number that, really, is just your relationship with gravity. That’s all that it is.

Samantha McKinney

And let me tell you an anecdote, too. Because I’ve almost used that same analogy, but flipped over with former clients. So for example, people give me a number and I’ll say OK. And I’m like, describe to me your life at that number and why it’s different than it is right now. And they go through all of these things.

And I’m like, OK let’s say you’re there and you step on the scale and it’s 10 or 15 pounds higher than that number that you said, but everything else is the same. The pants you have in mind, the energy levels you have, how much you show up for your kids or your family, let’s say it’s all there. Does it matter? And they’re like, well, no, I guess not.

And the reason that I do that is actually, if you approach a health program the right way, in a lot —  and this is the anecdote, I’ve seen time and time and time again people —  they hit their goal. They literally look and feel the way that they want to look. And their weight is way higher than they expected it to be. And so that, I think that’s really important.

And oftentimes it’s hard for people to actually buy into that until they see it happen for themselves. But it’s so common. And I just see people really hone in on that. And I’m like you’re progressing in every way that’s important to you, right? And I don’t know. I’ve just seen that quite a bit.

David Freeman

Well, I’ll throw this one at —  Oh, you look like you had something —

Jamie Martin

Do we need to go on to the next question?

David Freeman

No, I got it. Yeah, I’m going right there. I’m going right there. OK. So Sam, I’m throw this one at you. I know you both will be able to tag team it. So tell me the difference between a workout and a program. I heard you drop program a few times, so can you tell me the difference between a workout and a program?

Samantha McKinney

OK, so, workouts are obviously parts of programs, right? But this is super important. So a workout is anything that gets you moving, sweating, active, heart rate elevated, something that you enjoy, just kind of —  basically a healthy activity, right? And so there’s 1,000 examples of how to do that. That could be kayaking in a lake.

It could be a great studio class that you take. It could be meeting up with a friend and doing interval sprints, whatever it might be. So workouts can plug into programs. But not every workout is part of a program. So programming uses actual exercise science to progress you in a certain way, meaning every workout in your program has a purpose to the end goal and it builds.

And so what oftentimes people don’t realize and a huge FAQ that we get is, hey, there’s this particular strength workout. I want to know if I could just, like, sub it out for —  I don’t know, fill in the blank. Something that they’d rather be doing. And Yeah, occasionally that’s fine to do. However, I would say, if you’re doing that consistently, you’re not actually following the program.

And the results from the exercise might not be as you expect. Right? Because they actually were built mindfully.

Lindsay Ogden

Random input will get you random output. And so, again, I’m all about moving your body and doing it in the way that you enjoy, because that’ll get you to do it. Otherwise you probably won’t do it at all.

So a workout is better than nothing, I would say, for the most part. But if you have a goal in mind, there’s, again, a rhyme or reason why things are programmed the way that they are. So if you start taking things out and putting this thing in and that thing in, it’s like, that’s so random. Like, how do you know you’re getting better?

I always say, are you comparing apples to apples or apples to oranges? Like let’s be consistent. Because again, going back to the example of the weight and the other ways you can progress, in your training you can progress. Like I’m able to do more weight, obvious one, I’m able to take less rest on things, I’m able to do more sets or reps, like there’s all these ways that you can improve and you’re like physically getting better, performance wise, and that feels good, too.

I don’t know, if you’ve ever had a performance goal, I think reaching those feels so much better than stepping on a scale and being like, Oh I got to my goal weight. That’s so fleeting. Whereas, if you’ve ever seen someone hit a big lift or like do a movement that they couldn’t do before. And I know a lot of that in Alpha.

It’s cool to see them light up and that stays with you longer. And you’ve now put another tool in your tool belt of skills you have, versus something that literally changes every day based off your water weight and day to day things.

Samantha McKinney

Yeah. And I will say, too, let’s say your goal is weight loss. If you start to set performance goals with your programs and you start to hit those, watch what happens with your weight. You end up inadvertently seeing the results that you’re looking for anyway. And I also want to say, too, so like, sometimes there’s this reputation of hey, just doing workouts in classes, that’s just all fun and not effective.

And a reputation that hey, there’s programs and I’m doing the same four things over and over again and it’s boring and consistent, but that’s what works, right? The reality is that it’s somewhere in the middle, right? You can’t be bored or else you’re not going to exercise. You have to have fun. Classes and workouts can and should be part of your program, right?

But the key is just making sure that what you’re doing, day in and day out, is progressive and it makes sense from an exercise science standpoint. And part of what we’re excited about with the programs that we’re involved in is that it’s already built for you. You don’t have to think about that. And if, obviously, if you want something customized, that’s really what one on one fitness professionals are for. They can build a program for you or you, right? And that’s what they’re good at, right? They’re not just workout buddies. That’s the other big thing to know. Right?

Jamie Martin

Alright. Let’s keep moving, OK? And this ties in to some of the stuff we’re already talking about. We know many members come to Life Time with a weight loss goal. We hear that all the time in our member —  when new members join, we ask their goals. That’s a big one. So this next question, how much weight should I be losing? It’s a pretty common one. It shouldn’t surprise us, right? But is there an answer to that? An easy answer?

Samantha McKinney

You want to guess my answer?

Jamie Martin

Yeah, well, yeah.

Samantha McKinney

It depends.

Jamie Martin

Here we go.

Samantha McKinney

That’s my answer for everything. But because it’s true. I mean, obviously, I owe some follow up to that, but that is kind of the right answer for everything. So now, Lindsay, you want to kick off with this one?

Lindsay Ogden

I mean there’s —  whether it’s this question or I can think of another one that might be on your list, too, but it’s such a loaded question, too. We need to know a lot more about where they have been, where they currently are, and then their goals. I’m not going to sit here and say, in the back of your head, if your true goal, when we peel back layers is to keep up with your grandkids.

Or be able to keep up with your family on a hike on a summer vacation. That might be the real goal, or we’re maybe not there because we’re surface level chatting right now. So it’s hard to say what that weight should be. Because is that really your goal? And again, that weight number is fleeting. It’s not like you hit 150 and then you say at 150 once you get 150.

Samantha McKinney

They have to understand that there’s lots of reasons why that’s going to change and you’re dealing with that as you go through it. Sometimes I think giving specific examples can get people to be like, Oh, right? So for example, if you are having a wildly stressful week, your weight is going to be up. And there’s actual physiology to that.

Right? So we have a stress hormone called cortisol. Cortisol rises. That causes a rise of another hormone called aldosterone. Nobody has to memorize this, it’s just so people can kind of understand. That causes you to then hold on to sodium and water. So your weight is going to be up a couple of pounds. So that’s just stress.

It doesn’t mean you gain fat, right? So things are going to fluctuate and kind of go up and down. So when people are like, hey, how much can I lose? Well it depends on what is your body composition now, what is your exercise history, what is your nutrition, have you had blood testing lately, are your hormones OK, how much are you sleeping, how stressed out are you, right?

So which I know is a really —  sometimes it’s like you just want that black and white answer. And it’s so hard because there are these foundations and these programs and we’ve designed them to be effective and to work, but it’s rarely black and white thinking, too.

Lindsay Ogden

And I think a lot of times people will also associate weight loss equals fat loss. It doesn’t. Your weight is more than just your fat. So I think a lot of times people, especially early on, they’re like, Oh I lost this much weight already. It’s like, wait. But that’s not necessarily fat. So it’s like, there’s a difference there, too. Because at the end of day, that’s what people are really saying. They want to lose fat, not just weight in general.

Samantha McKinney

And let’s say somebody —  OK, over the course of the last month or whatever, or two months, and let’s say there’s just some sort of like massive weight number that they’ve lost. They most certainly have lost water weight, which isn’t always a bad thing, right? But it’s just something important to consider. Water is heavy.

But there’s a chance that they’re losing muscle, which is a huge concern of mine. Not only for their underlying health and how incredibly important lean body mass is for overall health and chronic disease risk and how somebody feels and functions, but even for their aesthetics. If that’s the goal, a lot of people don’t realize that a lot of what they’re picturing in their mind involves needing muscle.

So if you’re losing weight, muscle’s actually really heavy. It’s heavy. So if you’re losing a ton, you probably are losing lean mass and you know, you might be hitting some sort of scale number that you feel good about, but for some reason you just like, this isn’t necessarily what I thought I would look like at this weight. And I’m like, well, you got to build muscle and that involves putting on weight, which is sort of the opposite of what most people think that they want, right?

Right. It’s that counterintuitive. Like you just got, again, a shift in perspective. We got to think differently about that.

David Freeman

Yeah. So I got a question for all three of you all. Ready? Lindsay, do you lift weights?

Lindsay Ogden

Yes.

David Freeman

Heavy weights, moderate weight, light weight, what?

Lindsay Ogden

Depends on the training program.

David Freeman

Depends. Sounds like Sam. Alright. Alright, Sam.

Samantha McKinney

Lindsay’s pretty strong.

David Freeman

Yeah. I know. She’s being so humble. First time for everything.

Samantha McKinney

Oh. Oh, gosh. Here we go.

David Freeman

Sam? You? You lift weights?

Samantha McKinney

Yeah.

David Freeman

Jamie?

Jamie Martin

I do.

David Freeman

I got a question. I thought if you lift weights, you get bulky, though?

Samantha McKinney

What, you’re saying I’m not bulky?

David Freeman

Maybe. If that’s the goal, right? But no, no. So that’s the question I want to throw at you. So you hear it a lot. We come across a lot of clients that say, hey, I don’t want to lift that much weight, because I don’t want to look like this, I don’t want to get bulky. So can you all dive into that a little bit?

Samantha McKinney

Can I give one statement here?

Lindsay Ogden

Yeah. Yeah.

Samantha McKinney

Nobody, literally nobody, gets bulky by accident. It doesn’t happen, or else we would see a ton of really bulky, muscular guys walking around everywhere we go. It does not happen by accident. If somebody is trying to get bulky, there’s something called a hypertrophy program that they’re on. They’re consistent. They’re probably lifting four to five days a week. And there’s a very specific way that you need to eat in order for that to happen.

Lindsay Ogden

And recover. People that —  because we think, we associate, like, muscles and lifting weights with, like, bodybuilders. And all they do is workout, eat, and sleep. That’s it. That’s their life. So.

But it’s funny, because I’ve heard before this comparison of women being scared that if they start lifting then they’re going to get bulky. It’s the same thing as opening a savings account and thinking you’re becoming a millionaire. Like, it doesn’t happen like that. And I think it’s, like, less than 3% of women have enough testosterone, naturally, in their bodies to even get bulky. I’ve been lifting for 12 years. And I mean there’s a little there. But I wouldn’t say I’m bulky.

Yeah. And it’s certainly, the process of getting there, is really, really gradual. So gosh, if you’re ever looking in a mirror and you’re like Oh, I’m at this like level of muscle I don’t necessarily like want more than this. OK. Go into maintenance mode. Right? Like you’re exactly where you need to be then, right? You’re not going to wake up one day and be like, Oh, too much, too much, right?

So one thing I will say is I wouldn’t say it’s bulky, but you kind of have like a puffy feeling? That’s more managing than recovery. And managing the inflammation that’s going along with your harder training. So that is the one thing that I think women will say they don’t want or they want to try to avoid. And that’s like, OK, what’s your nutrition look like, what’s your sleep, what’s your stress management? Because that does play a role into it. But again, they’re not bulky, they just maybe aren’t as lean or as tight as they want to look.

Samantha McKinney

And if someone’s struggling with puffiness or water retention there’s usually something else going on there. There could be adrenal stress issues happening, your thyroid could be off, which we talked about the other day. So if there’s somebody dealing with, like, ongoing fluid retention, puffiness, there’s probably something else underneath the surface that we need to talk about.

Jamie Martin

Digging a little deeper and see really what’s going on there.

David Freeman

So I said to maybe challenge a lot of our trainers, because they’re challenged with this. And when you have the client come up to you and say, hey, I don’t want to continue to lift these weights, because I’m starting to see that I’m getting bulky. And their perception versus —  we see the reality that that’s not happening. How would you handle that? How would you coach the coach to come back? I want to say rebuttal, but just to help walk them through that process.

Samantha McKinney

You know, I would say it kind of goes back to the start of someone’s program of —  it is so important to come up with those tracking parameters for success, right? So figuring out what is that underlying goal, what parameters matter. Is it body weight? I would caution you to never make body weight the only thing that you’re tracking.

Right? Is it body fat percentage? Is it circumference measurements? Is it progress photos? Not before and afters, right? Like, figure out the ways that you want to track. And what I find is that the fitness professionals that have the most kind of satisfied clients and have the biggest success stories are the ones that have agreed upon tracking parameters and they stick with them.

So they actually don’t end up —  I know it’s not answering the question directly, but they don’t end up in that conversation. Because you’re constantly tracking. Whether it’s weekly or every two weeks or every month. So there’s never any surprises, really. Because you’re sort of monitoring trends as you go, which is so important.

Lindsay Ogden

And really what that comes down to is, like, the client always has an expectation. Whether it’s the session, or like, the program. They have an expectation of what that outcome is going to be. So it’s constantly checking in with them on that, too, so you can make sure you’re being either real with them that is or isn’t doable or meeting them at their expectation.

Because I think that’s where those issues happen, is like well I thought I was going to be like this. And it’s not. And my trainer hasn’t really addressed it. So maybe it’s something wrong with the program, or wrong with them, or wrong with me. I don’t know. So it’s just touching base on what those are.

Samantha McKinney

I know I say it depends a lot. But I’m going to speak in an absolute right now.

David Freeman

Ooh.

Samantha McKinney

Yeah. Yeah. You guys excited? Yeah. So out of —  so I’ve been dietician trainer for 15 years, OK? So I have never once, never once, had a client who’s put on muscle and lean mass and not been happy about what was actually happening with how they were feeling or how they looked. Not once.

Even if, initially, they started out thinking like, no, no, no, my goal is to lose weight, I don’t want to put on muscle, I don’t put on muscle. Take some time and they’re like, Oh, this is what muscle building really means. And it’s this awesome epiphany to see. And what I like about that mindset is that it’s like additive. Right?

And we kind of take that mindset with nutrition, as well, too. Sometimes you were like, Oh, what am I supposed to give up? What am I supposed to avoid? And we talk about like, no, why don’t we focus on what you should be doing. It’s kind of a similar analogy. But that additive mindset of it’s refreshing to think to yourself, OK, if I put on muscle, even if I thought my goal was weight loss, I’m actually progressing. You know? But I’ve never once, never once, had a client that didn’t like their muscle gain.

David Freeman

Yeah. So they evolve within their mindset. I mean, the physical result is the physical result. But they also have been educated now and they understand more, which makes it all makes sense. I love that.

Jamie Martin

Alright. So I know another question you guys get is people wanting to know how consistently they need to exercise. Can you just push it really hard a couple hours a week and call it good?

Lindsay Ogden

I actually just heard a story. It was like basically —  I think it was Great Britain and Norwegian, like, boating team to try to get to the South Pole. And they were —  one team’s philosophy was, when the weather’s good, we’re going to go as hard as we can. And then when the weather’s bad we’re going to take off days.

And the others was, we’re going to hit a certain amount of miles every single day regardless of weather. And that was the team that ended up getting there first, and they also weren’t broken and sick and whatever by the end of it. So I know, when we had our habit podcast, it’s mastering the art of showing up.

Especially for people that haven’t been consistent in the past. I don’t really care what you do to start, but getting yourself there. Whether that means just getting your shoes on to go outside, whether that means to get to the gym door. And even if you just go in and go out. Or eventually, you’ll start to add in more and actually do things when you’re there.

But to answer the question, it’s —  we got to figure out where you’re at now, because we don’t want to go to the extreme. Because that’s not sustainable. You’re probably going to end up injured, hurt, whatever. You can’t keep that up. So it is one step at a time. But whatever that is, it’s the consistency of it and building on it. You can’t just go on the days you feel like it. It’s not a motivation thing. It’s like, nope, this is who. I am this is what Lindsey does. And I show up every day to that.

Samantha McKinney

And I would say, too, like with my coaching clients, I always had the mantra up on my wall, always, consistency is greater than intensity. Every single time. And so this could be, I will be thrilled as a coach if you hit your water goal every single day this week, right? And I’ll be more impressed with that than you coming in —  and I’ll use water because you use exercise as an example, and saying, hey, I drink two gallons of water today. Well, OK. Are you hydrated every day? So it’s like — right as you take a sip.

But its consistency beats intensity every single time. And that doesn’t mean that you have to be perfect to see results. It’s actually quite the opposite. It’s sort of like, it’s another bank account analogy, essentially. So like, every single good choice you make, you’re putting a deposit in. And every once in a while, if you have a birthday or anniversary, or just something comes up, or you have a busy day, you make a little withdrawal.

It’s not going to throw your whole program off track. You’re not starting over. And what I find is those people that have that intensity mindset are also the people that have the perfectionist mindset. Where they’re all or nothing. They’re either all in on a program, and then they make one little thing off track, and by the way nobody’s perfect.

David Freeman

Yeah.

Samantha McKinney

David, you’re not perfect. Jamie, you’re not perfect. Right? We’re not perfect as coaches. And so, when you have that perfection mindset, if you’re in a program and you’re like, OK, I’m going to do all of this and be so rigid. I’m going to be so perfect at this program, I’m going to knock it out. Life’s going to happen and you’re going to have a misstep.

And I always say, it’s not if you have a misstep, it’s when. And those that are most successful are the ones who understand that. Shake it off and then pick up with their next meal versus Monday, versus next month, versus the first of the year. So it really is about understanding that —  what you do most is what’s going to drive results. And you need that 80% to 90% on to allow yourself that 10% to 20% off. Right?

David Freeman

Yeah, the mental resilience is huge, as far as knowing how to bounce back when something does go not as planned. So I love how you framed that up.

Samantha McKinney

Even with, like, our detox, for example. Our Life Time detox. It’s like a 14 day protocol. And, yes, we give you like, hey here’s approved food list, here’s the non-approved foods list. Here’s what you do. Most people are really surprised when they message and they’re like Oh my gosh, xy and z happened. I fell off track. Do I have to start over? I’m like no.

We’re aiming for a b-plus here. You’re not —  and they’re like Oh really? Like, yes. I mean, be as on track as you can but you shouldn’t —  there’s that famous quote that perfection is the enemy of progress, right? So it’s just —  that being said though, flip side of the coin, is we have run into people in the coaching inbox that are like, hey you know, I’m following this program.

I’m not seeing results. And it turns out that they’re not as consistent as they thought. And I’m not saying that, at all, to shame them. I mean, even as a coach myself, if I am not tracking what I’m doing on a day to day basis, I genuinely think I’m more consistent than I am too. So I’m like, why don’t we try this? For the next 10 days, write everything down.

Your workouts. Your sleep. Your nutrition. And they usually come back and they’re like, wow. Like I saw some real opportunities there. But it’s —  I think human nature is in our minds, is we assume that our intentions are the reality that happens. And you know, we don’t live in a world that makes it super easy to be healthy. We live in a world that makes it really easy to make poor choices and that’s what’s most convenient. And so, it takes a lot of purposeful effort and you do need to track to see how consistent you are.

Lindsay Ogden

Yeah, working with individual clients, one thing I like to work with them on is, they establish what those daily things are that they want to do. And we even kind of did this in our drill. But it literally should be something that you can say yes I did or no I didn’t. And you’re marking that. And my biggest ask is, if you’re not marking, it tell me about that situation.

Because we want to talk through it and how do we handle those differently. But the other thing with that is, and this is James Clear. He said, if you’re doing something like a healthy habit, let’s say it’s drinking your water every day, whatever your goal is. As soon as you miss a day, that’s fine. You messed up. One day, move on.

Pick it up. Like you said, doesn’t have to be Monday. Just start the next moment. But if it becomes 2 days in a row, that’s the start of a new habit. So it really is pulling back, who do I want to be and what do I want to do, And making sure I’m in alignment with that. Not getting that disconnect happening, because then you are starting a new habit.

And I am no longer Lindsay who drinks water every day, if it’s going two or more days in the other direction. So I think that’s something, too, people —  going back to —  should I do this and should I do that, what supplement should I have? And should I wear this device for tracking my calories? Is like, you’re worrying about all these things. It’s just those small steps that we are consistent in. I can’t stress that enough. And how much further that’s going to get you in life than stressing about those things.

And you’re going right back there to those puzzle pieces. The foundational puzzle pieces right there.

David Freeman

It’s like Lindsay can see into the future or something. Because the next question is around nutrition. It’s frequently asked questions around nutrition. I need to ask the question. Do I need supplements or is food alone good enough? Take a moment, because I know that, automatically, we go to our default answer in our head. Like, yes, we need supplements. Because the top soil and this, that, and a third. I really want us to dig deep here. And I want to know exactly what you guys think.

Lindsay Ogden

Well, if you want to go first?

Samantha McKinney

Yeah, sure. I’ll start with this. So. Let’s first talk about supplement quality. Because that does matter. And we don’t have to go into the weeds, here. Because we have a lot of resources for that. But if you are taking high quality supplements, made from good quality, raw materials, good supply chain, final products are tested, all of that, that is a completely different ballgame than just picking up whatever right off the shelf. So let’s just have this discussion under the caveat that hey we’re talking about good quality stuff that we can trust, it’s not contaminated, et cetera.

So. I would say, it depends on how easy you want your program to be. Right? It’s a similar question, to me as a Coach, and somebody that is really passionate about physiology, as do I have to sleep eight hours a night, or can I get away with six? Do you want to make your program more effective or less effective? Right?

And so, no. You don’t have to take supplements. Nobody has to do anything. You don’t have to lift. You don’t have to sleep. You don’t have to drink your water. I would say, though, good quality supplements, and I’m not talking about just some sort of random berry extract that’s marketed as, you know, the next weight loss miracle.

That’s not what I’m talking about. I’m talking about core things that are essential to metabolism. Such as vitamin D, magnesium, omega 3s, those types of things. Do you want to support your body in what you’re trying to do, or do you want to just make it a little bit more challenging? And so, no, you genuinely don’t have to take supplements.

I’m certainly not saying you’ll never get to your goal if you don’t take supplements. But I do look at them as, if you’re doing this strategically with high quality things that help accelerate you towards the level of health that you want to be, the wellness the way that you want to feel. Why not?

Lindsay Ogden

Right. I also think, going back to the question of how many times should I work out, or how much should I weigh. The supplement question to me, too, is something that —  there are supplements out there that I think anyone can take and they’d be fine with. But there are some things that I think people spend money on and they take and it’s like, should you even be taking that?

I mean, we do lab testing. And I think that is very important. Because if you think about time and money and energy, like, you’re kind of throwing that away if it’s something that you don’t really need. And we could be putting that energy and focus somewhere else. I will say, I’m a big believer in food first. And that the supplement should support that, they shouldn’t replace that.

And when I say replace, I’m not saying, like, you’re having a shake because you don’t have time in the morning. Like that’s a convenient thing for you, and that works for you. And that’s just fine. I’m saying, like, if you’re eating, like, garbage, and you’re also having nice expensive supplements, you’re not really doing much for yourself there. You need to still address the food first, and then, also, add in those supplements.

Samantha McKinney

I do want to hit on that, though, because that actually does cause a lot of confusion. Yes. I think, across the board, our entire coaching team, our philosophy is food first, or food and, right? Like, supplements will never replace food. But whether your diet is on point or whether it’s lacking, they can still provide you nutrition and micronutrients.

And those certainly won’t hurt, right? And I mean, you hit on the shake piece, too. And I almost want to talk about that. Because sometimes I think when people hear supplements, they think just pills. Right? But the protein powders do matter as well. Our passion for getting people to eat protein. I’m sure you’ve felt that like kind of come through.

It’s because we see that it works. We see in blood work that people move in the right direction when they’re consistently hitting their protein. They feel better. They’re sleeping better. Their cravings are curbed. All of that. And if you can hit your protein targets without protein powder, genuinely have at it. That’s great.

A lot of times, again, this kind of goes back to the world that we live in. It’s not set up for us to eat, you know, super healthy on the run or convenience. Right? The things that you typically grab are usually, typically, high in sugar, high in refined carbohydrates, not high in protein. And using a high quality protein powder, because it almost feels like this dichotomy of what you’re saying eat the real foods of that but you’re telling me to do a shake.

I’m like, OK. Stop for a minute and back up if you didn’t do the shake what would your alternative have been? Would it have been not eating a meal and having a blood sugar low? Would it have been picking up fast food or something of the gas station that might not align with your goals?

So this is about looking at what can I do to surround myself with to make this easier and doable. Because sometimes taking on a program can feel really intimidating. Here’s all the things I have to give up and here’s all the things I have to start doing. And our goal, with all of these programs, like, these ones, or just in general, our philosophy with helping people and how we Coach clients is, as coaches, our job is to make this as easy for you as possible to achieve health and success.

This should not be an intimidating or scary thing and it doesn’t have to be. And so the supplement piece, and the protein shake piece, and the shakes, all of that. That is just one layer of how to make things easier. Right? So I don’t want people to feel like that’s something that —  Oh, my gosh, you’re pushing that.

That’s all you want to do. It’s like no. I’ve genuinely seen with clients that it can make the path easier. If you choose not to, that’s fine. But it’s up to me to sort of explain all of it to you and sort of lay out these goals. And it’s sort of like informed consent. You choose from there. Right? And I’ll support whatever your choice is, I just want to make sure it’s informed.

Jamie Martin

Right? It sounds like you’re saying, like, we want it to make it easy but also sustainable for people. And if that’s something that can help people stick with a habit or make a change that lasts. We’re going to help them with that, in whatever way we can. For sure. Alright. So we are coming up on time here. I know that flew by. But you guys have any other questions we didn’t get to that you want to make sure we address before we wrap things up?

Samantha McKinney

I mean, we’ll probably —  especially since we’re low on time and need to be capped with this. But I do think we should head on address the calorie question.

Lindsay Ogden

Oh. Yes.

Jamie Martin

Yes. OK.

Lindsay Ogden

How many calories should I be eating? I’ll repeat that. How many calories should I be eating coach Sam?

Samantha McKinney

It depends. No —

Jamie Martin

OK, so. I felt like that was a little bit of an SNL moment, right? You guys did that.

Samantha McKinney

OK, so. What I find —  OK, let me just summarize it this way. Yes the amount of calories that you’re eating and the amount of calories that you’re burning does matter, right? Science is pretty clear on that. Now, that doesn’t mean that you have to track all of the calories that you’re eating and all of the calories that you’re burning to get them to balance themselves.

So that’s the thing that people are like, Oh, calories matter, but we’re not really hyper focused on tracking them. So how that work? If you are eating foods in the right balance and you’re eating a nutrient dense diet, it is nearly impossible to overeat on calories. Because real, whole, unprocessed, foods, so high quality proteins, lots of vegetables, high fiber fruits, complex carbohydrates, healthy fats.

They’re so filling. Right? So the calories genuinely balance themselves. And yes, I have had clients where we do track calories, but it’s not in perpetuity. There’s bouts of it as we’re adjusting their program and what they should be eating. Because again, they do matter. I mean, definitely not saying that they don’t.

But calories, macros, your protein, fat, carbs, all of those are really relevant to your success. But obsessively tracking for years on end is not the best approach. Periodically taking maybe two to three weeks of tracking every day and making strategic adjustments, and then heading into a mode of eating real food, that kind of lands in that ballpark, is a lot more sustainable.

Lindsay Ogden

Yeah, the measuring and tracking, I think, is education. But to your point, if you are so fixated on that that you carry that with you the rest of your life, it’s hard to enjoy food. It’s hard to enjoy that experience. You’re so fixated on how much is this and does that fit in my app and oh that’s not the right thing.

And it’s overwhelming. And honestly, for health purposes, I don’t think it’s worth it. I think if you’re a performance athlete, whatever, you might take it to that level. But in this case, no. And then, you kind of hit on the calories in, calories out. Tracking, in my experience, any type of device, whatever, like, your workout shouldn’t be about your calories burned.

You should focus on moving your body in a way that feels good, that you maybe have those progression goals there. And that you’re not too sedentary throughout the day. I think, the thing that people overlook when it comes to weight loss, is if I truly wanted you to be on a sustainable weight loss program, not do too much too soon, I would tell you let’s address your nutrition and walk.

Like, I wouldn’t even start with exercise. Because again, people go too far in one direction. And then they’re not able to keep up with that or they get injured or whatever it may be. True weight loss; keeping your body moving throughout the day, not being too sedentary, and addressing your nutrition. Because at some point, you can’t keep doing more. Or you can’t keep eating less.

Samantha McKinney

And a couple of final thoughts there too, is, if we just talked real practical standpoint as well, the calories burned during your workout, and literature has shown that that is not what is the stimulus for weight loss. It does become more relevant in maintenance mode, for sure. But exercise should be a stimulus to your body to change.

That’s really what it should be. And it’s really important for metabolism, and how you’re functioning, and all that. But it’s a stimulus for change. And that’s where we go back to that whole program conversation. This is about blasting as many calories as we can. It’s can we nudge your body in the right direction? Because our bodies are really strong, and they adapt.

And so, if you send a consistent message to do something such as get stronger, build muscle, shed fat, it’ll start to do that, and it’s less about the calories in session and more about what the whole program is doing for you. The other thing on the food side, with the calories in, calories out, is sometimes initially, we get that question a lot.

How many calories should I be targeting? How many calories should be targeting? And I almost want to stop and say, hey, if you follow the nutrition protocols that we lay out in our coaching or if you’re in one of these programs, wouldn’t it be nice to stop and watch yourself for a month? And what if you’re seeing success without tracking any calories? Doesn’t that sound refreshing? Like, why don’t we give that a chance first? And usually that ends up working out.

Jamie Martin

I love it. Alright. Last chance. Any other questions you want to get to? Otherwise, David has a few questions for you.

Samantha McKinney

As usual.

David Freeman

Oh, yeah.

Lindsay Ogden

In that case, we have five more. No, I’m just kidding.

David Freeman

Alright. So you will be the first two to experience this. We usually do a 2 minute drill and it’s questions that being thrown at you, the difference this time around is going to be reaction. So you’re reacting to the word. The first thing that comes to mind when you hear the word. I have a subset of questions for Lindsey, and then a subset for you, Sam. So who would like to go first?

Lindsay Ogden

Sam can go first.

Samantha McKinney

Oh, I was about to say Lindsey. She beat me to it.

Jamie Martin

Look at how fast she was at that.

Lindsay Ogden

Look at that reaction time. Talk about reaction. Right?

David Freeman

OK, so. Here we go.

Samantha McKinney

Hold on, I’m going to take a deep breath. OK.

David Freeman

You ready? You good?

Lindsay Ogden

We weren’t nervous at all, until now.

Samantha McKinney

And every single time we wrap up a podcast, you go are you ready? And my answer is always no, I’m never ready for this.

David Freeman

Depends.

Samantha McKinney

There you go.

David Freeman

Alright. You got this. Alright. Here we go. Reaction. The first thing that comes to mind when you hear this. OK. Try to answer in less than 10 seconds. Here we go.

David Freeman

Red.

Samantha McKinney

White and blue.

David Freeman

Obese.

Samantha McKinney

Support.

David Freeman

Fire.

Samantha McKinney

Are these one-word answers?

David Freeman

Yes.

Samantha McKinney

OK.

David Freeman

I mean you gave me —

Samantha McKinney

Yeah. I was going to say, because my first one. Yeah, OK. What did you say?

David Freeman

Fire, sorry.

Samantha McKinney

Drill.

David Freeman

Amazing.

Samantha McKinney

Grace.

David Freeman

Family.

Samantha McKinney

Love.

David Freeman

Hungry.

Samantha McKinney

Protein.

David Freeman

Sick.

Samantha McKinney

Well? Now I’m just giving up. I don’t know, I feel like —

David Freeman

The first thing that comes to mind. Health.

Samantha McKinney

Vitality.

David Freeman

So you had this question in another podcast that we did, but I’m going to throw it at you again.

Samantha McKinney

Did you not like my first answer?

David Freeman

No, no, you know what, matter of fact, I’m going to pose a different question, just because you already answered this one. I want to know, out of the two, which one are you more afraid of, or were you more afraid of, when you were younger. Jason? Or Freddy?

Samantha McKinney

I literally watch zero scary movies.

David Freeman

Oh my gosh.

Samantha McKinney

You know this about me and pop culture.

David Freeman

We got Freddy Krueger. We got Jason. We just need to go do —

Samantha McKinney

I knew Final Destination last time. So I —

David Freeman

Do you know Freddy? You know who Freddy is? Freddy Krueger?

Samantha McKinney

Is he with Frito fingers?

David Freeman

Fritos, OK.

Samantha McKinney

You know. No, no, Bugles. They were bugles. People used to do that. OK. You know what I’m talking about right? I don’t —

David Freeman

Nice, nice, yeah I do.

Samantha McKinney

— like I said, I literally —  so OK, do you remember the movie Scream? So you know how it was kind of — it wasn’t as intense of a horror movie as some of those? It was almost like some die hard horror movie fans like kind of laughed at Scream? Like that scared me for months. Like I could not.

David Freeman

That gives me perspective.

Samantha McKinney

I only watch comedy so I can escape the stress of everyday life.

David Freeman

I’ll just ask this question. Favorite romance movie?

Samantha McKinney

Oh. Romance movie. They’re all Rom coms. I mean the Notebook, I would say is —

David Freeman

Oh, I should have said it. I know you were thinking it. I should have just said you’re going to say the Notebook.

Samantha McKinney

Because that’s like the first romance movie I could think of. But I told you, I watch comedies.

David Freeman

I got the body —  You got a few. Bodyguards. A few of them out there. But we’ll go with that. Alright. Are you passing the ball?

Lindsay Ogden

Bodyguard?

Samantha McKinney

I would love to pass the ball.

Lindsay Ogden

Queen of the night.

David Freeman

And that’s going to be —

Lindsay Ogden

Danced to that soundtrack.

David Freeman

Queen of habit, now talking about the queen of the night. Reaction game with Lindsay Ogden. Are we ready?

Lindsay Ogden

Shoot.

David Freeman

Alright, here we go. Balloon.

Lindsay Ogden

It. Because we were just talking about it.

David Freeman

Running.

Lindsay Ogden

Shoes.

David Freeman

Depression.

Lindsay Ogden

Sad.

David Freeman

Vibrant.

Lindsay Ogden

Happy. I’m so basic.

David Freeman

Sweat.

Lindsay Ogden

Working out.

David Freeman

Diet.

Lindsay Ogden

Healthy.

David Freeman

Fear.

Lindsay Ogden

Scared.

David Freeman

Resistance.

Lindsay Ogden

Band?

Samantha McKinney

Says trainer Lindsay.

David Freeman

Difficult.

Lindsay Ogden

I don’t know why, I want to say math. Math.

Jamie Martin

I love it.

David Freeman

We know what subject was hard for you. OK.

Lindsay Ogden

It’s actually my best one, which is weird.

David Freeman

Oh. OK. This has not been asked to you yet. So what do you want to leave as a stamp of impact in the year 2021?

Lindsay Ogden

So I recently made a transition to the team with Sam. And prior to that, I had been on a team where I was losing connection, directly with members and with clients. So getting back to that, specifically in 2021, honestly, whether it’s what I’m putting out on social or the behind the scenes coaching that we do, I just want to be support for people.

Whether that comes in the form of, they’re just seeing it, hearing it, it’s more inspiration, motivation, or it truly is having some of those deeper conversations. I still stay in contact with a lot of clients that I had when I was in the club. So just being that support system for them. So 2021, specifically, I would say getting back to that. Because that, to me, is very fulfilling.

David Freeman

I’ve been witnessing, and you’re off to a good start.

Lindsay Ogden

Thanks.

Jamie Martin

Awesome. Alright. Sam and Lindsay.

Lindsay Ogden

Thank you.

Jamie Martin

Where can people find you both? If you want to share your Instagram handles or any place you are on social or online.

Samantha McKinney

So I would say the Life Time Training Facebook group. You obviously can find us within Life Time, the digital programs that are available through the member app. You can reach Lindsey and I and the coaching team there. I do have an Instagram handle but it is not really a fitness focused one, it’s mainly pictures of my baby. Lindsay’s Instagram handle is way more fun.

Lindsay Ogden

I’d also say, if you’re in any of the digital programs, we are doing a lot of the coaching there. So it’s real people, real coaches. So there. And then, Instagram is @lindzmarielife on there.

Jamie Martin

Awesome. Thanks, you guys. We’re going to have to do another Q&A session like this. Again. There’s always questions coming up. So.

Samantha McKinney

Thanks for having us. I think it’s super important.

Lindsay Ogden

Yes. Our pleasure. Thank you, guys.

[MUSIC]

David Freeman

Thanks for joining us for this episode. As always, we’d love to hear your thoughts on our conversation today, and how you approach this aspect of healthy living in your own life. What works for you? Where do you run into challenges? Where do you need help?

Jamie Martin

And if you have topics for future episodes, you can share those with us, too. Email us at lttalks@lt.life, or reach out to us on Instagram, @lifetime.life@jamiemartinel, or @freezy30, and use the hashtag #LifeTimeTalks. You can also learn more about the podcast at el.lifetime.life/podcasts.

David Freeman

And if you’re enjoying Life Time Talks, please subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Feel free to rate and review, and share on your social channels too.

Jamie Martin

Thanks for listening. We’ll talk to you next time on Life Time Talks.

Life Time Talks is a production of Life Time, healthy way of life. It’s produced by Molly Schelper, with audio engineering by Peter Perkins, and video production by Kevin Dixon, Coy Larson, and the team at LT Motion. A big thank you to the team who pulls together each episode, and everyone who provided feedback.

We’d Love to Hear From You

Have thoughts you’d like to share or topic ideas for future episodes? Email us at lttalks@lt.life.

The information in this podcast is intended to provide broad understanding and knowledge of healthcare topics. This information is for educational purposes only and should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of advice from your physician or healthcare provider. We recommend you consult your physician or healthcare professional before beginning or altering your personal exercise, diet or supplementation program.

Back To Top