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a father and toddler eat yogurt
By Henry Emmons, MD
Boosting the gut’s healthy microbes can support a more positive outlook.
illustration of a man laying on the ground with thought bubble
By Henry Emmons, MD
Becoming more mindful of our racing thoughts can help slow them down.
An empty bottle of alcohol
By Courtney Helgoe
Substance use is surging during the COVID-19 pandemic. We talked to a therapist and addiction counselor about how we can take care of ourselves and those we love.
illustration of a man looking at his phone with light bouncing back into his face
By Michael Dregni
We all do it, especially in these trying times. Here are four tips to stop doomscrolling — and improve your mental health.
Two women giving high-five on beach
By Henry Emmons, MD
How cultivating joy for others can help transform scarcity thinking.
A person shutting down her cellphone
By Henry Emmons, MD
Here are four ways to reduce the negative impact of your digital devices.
Person on laptop in bed at night
By Henry Emmons, MD
How digital devices affect our mental health.
Hand shows the brain in the sun and sky.
By Pilar Gerasimo
Like it or not, emotions share some very real biochemical links with your nervous, endocrine, immune and digestive systems. Isn't it time you learned something about how your body responds to what you feel—and vice versa?
Woman listening to headphones and resting
By Aviva Romm, MD
Use these techniques to consciously shift your body's response to stress into a state that’s calm, secure, and replenished.
illustration smiley face intertwined with shoelace
By Michael Dregni
Feeling anxious? Angry? Hostile? Depressed? There may be an exercise to help with that.
An illustration of a woman lying on a bed with a cloud of jumbled thoughts coming out of her head.
By Alexandra Smith, MA, LPCC 
These strategies can help you break free from the spiral of negative thoughts.
illustration woman hugging knees while thoughts swirl around head
By David Richo, PhD
Feeling discounted, vulnerable, and self-conscious are just three common categories of emotional triggers.
illustration medicine and hugging
By Henry Emmons, MD
Loneliness is a huge health risk for us all. Here are ways to create more high-quality connections.
two pairs of hands holding
By David Richo, PhD
A psychotherapist offers actionable advice for handling our trigger reactions.
illustration person holding head with stress squiggle
By Alexandra Smith, MA, LPCC 
If you're struggling with anxiety and unsure whether to seek help or ride it out, consider the following factors.
A stressed-out Black man holds his hand in his face.
By Alexandra Smith, MA, LPCC 
Learn why anxiety goes hand in hand with depression and irritability — and how to treat it.
A contemplative woman in workout clothes stretches her arms.
By Molly Tynjala
Taking time off can enhance workplace productivity and personal well-being. Try these four tips to make the most of your day off.
a father and son showing affection
By Henry Emmons, MD
Many doctors prescribe medication for teen anxiety, but an integrative developmental and behavioral pediatrician offers these natural therapies.
An illustration of a depressed person sitting inside the whole of a donut.
By Michael Dregni
Consuming sugar can lead to body-wide inflammation, microbiome disruption, insulin resistance, and more.
Illustration of three rows of glasses with liquid, a straw, and lemon wheel garnish.
By Henry Emmons, MD
When the temperature rises, serotonin levels may fall, along with your mood. Turn down the heat with these Ayurveda-inspired tips.
Woman sitting on the ground in an entryway looking outside at her yard.
By Henry Emmons, MD
Whether you have five minutes, 20 minutes, two hours, or all day, here are some ways to get outside.
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