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a woman looks forelornely out a window
By Henry Emmons, MD
Labeling all mood dysregulation as “depression” may interfere with effective treatment. Consider this a more nuanced approach.
An illustration of two hands reaching for one another, with a heart placed in the palm of one of the hands.
By Julie Dulude
This year’s theme highlights the need for universal access to resources. Discover what you can do to support your own and others’ mental well-being.
headshot of Jamie Martin, editor in chief of Experience Life magazine
By Jamie Martin
Experience Life editor Jamie Martin on emotional agility and mental well-being.
a woman covers her face while in front of chalk board with random squiggles around her head
By Alexandra Smith, MA, LPCC
What is OCD, and what are some treatment options?
Eric Jeffers

Just as you train your body, it’s important to also train your brain. Meditation is a powerful tool we can use to become more aware, compassionate, and focused — in as little as a few minutes a day. In this mini episode, Eric Jeffers, yoga and meditation Master Trainer at Life Time, explains the strength of meditation and offers simple tips anyone can use to get started.

Dr. Drew Ramsey

Of all the calories we eat each day, 20 percent are used by our brains — so it’s no wonder there’s such a strong connection between our nutritional habits and mental-health status. Drew Ramsey, MD, psychiatrist, author, and mental-health advocate, joins us to explain this relationship and teach us about the food choices that best support our brains and mental well-being.

two sets of feet with hiking boots overlooking a mountain lake
By Molly Tynjala
Learn how going outdoors can help ease depression and hypertension and improve resiliency and immunity.
a man wearing military fatigues talks and laughs on his phone
By Michael Dregni
The Department of Veteran Affairs has developed several apps to help veterans cope with trauma — but they're available to everyone.
a man uses a rowing machine
By Michael Dregni and Maggie Fazeli Fard
Moving your body can help you sharpen your focus, improve your mood, and more.
glass jars with various white pills and supplements spilling out
By Henry Emmons, MD
These supplements can help settle the nervous system and calm a worried mind.
a woman stretches in her living room
By Michael Dregni
Morning movement can increase cognitive skills, according to a recent study.
a parent talks with a child
By Michael Dregni
Sleep disorders, gastrointestinal infections, and a higher risk of premature death are just some of the possible effects, according to a recent study.
essential oil bottle and various dried herbs and flower
By Henry Emmons, MD
Essential oils and aromatherapy can support mental and emotional health in many ways, says our columnist Henry Emmons, MD.
a young man looks at his phone
By Katherine Reynolds Lewis
Technology has reshaped the way we process our feelings. This expert advice can help us navigate the digital emotional landscape more smoothly.
A young boy plays with a fidget spinner
By Alexandra Smith, MA, LPCC
Treating ADHD starts by understanding what it is — and what it isn't.
A woman writing in a journal in her bedroom.
By Jen Elmquist, MA, LMFT
Learn how to focus on solutions rather than problems in Part Three of this three-part series.
A ripped piece of paper that spells out Parkinson's disease
By Craig Cox
Cases of the debilitating neurological disease have been surging in recent years and some researchers suggest COVID-19 may accelerate the trend.
A woman smiling, basking in the sun.
By Jen Elmquist, MA, LMFT
Learn how to control your inner conversation and maintain a steady mental state in Part Two of this three-part series.
image of a pool with the sun and clouds reflected
By Wallace J. Nichols, PhD
Why being around water is so good for our psyches.
Casey Urban with her family
By Casey Urban
Through ongoing therapy and joyful movement, Casey Urban shares her journey of self-love and body acceptance after an eating disorder.
a woman sits on a couch with her eyes closed
By Jen Elmquist, MA, LMFT
Learn how to reduce your body’s stress response in Part One of this three-part series.
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